• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A study of why the USSR signed a non aggression pact with Germany rather than with the Western Powers?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

A study of why the USSR signed a non aggression pact with Germany rather than with the Western Powers? Ana Gosnar Mr. Rowe May 30, 2004 Word Count: 1798 CONTENTS: A. Plan of investigation Page 3 B. Summary of Evidence Page 3-4 C. Evaluation of Sources Page 5 D. Analysis Page 5-6 E. Conclusion Page 7 F. List of Sources Page 8 A study of why the USSR signed a non-aggression pact with Germany rather than with the Western Powers? A Plan of the investigation This investigation will try to establish why Stalin signed a non-aggression pact with Hitler rather than with the Western powers. In the main body of this historical investigation it will be discussed why Stalin signed the pact with Hitler, with Germany's and USSR's specific aims stated, and why and where they originated. Also discussed will be the events occurring prior to the signing of the non-aggression pact, with specific emphasis on the League of Nations, the Treaty of Versailles and The Munich conference. The previous foreign relations between the USSR and Germany and the USSR and other European countries will also be conveyed. B Summary of evidence Soviet foreign policy wanted to build a system of alliances which would end the USSR's isolation from the world. Stalin feared that Germany would be pulled in an alliance against Soviet Russia with the Western Powers.1 His fear increased when Germany joined ...read more.

Middle

The book mostly concentrates on what the pact led to in relation to the Baltic States. The reason this book was valuable was because it shows how other countries saw the pact between Russia and Germany. Its limitations might include that it is written by a Latvian author, so some events are written from a Latvian point of view. Grey Ian (1982). Stalin -Man of Steel. Great Britain: Cox & Wyman Ltd. This book is written by a British author Ian Grey, I understand that this is one the best bibliography's about Stalin written by a non communist. This book's main advantage was that it had a section between the wars, where it described Stalin's and the USSR's views on Russia and how it affected the world. Even though the book was concentrating on Stalin, most of the important events and names were mentioned. Some limitations that are noticeable are that the author is biased, in some cases, and also that the book doesn't give all the detail of some of the important events that happened. D Analysis The USSR and Germany were the most unlikely countries to enter into a pact of any sort that one can imagine at the time. During the 1930's Hitler had made no secrets of his racial contempt for the Slavs, his political contempt of Bolshevism and his ideas of territorial expansion into the USSR to create 'Lebensraum' for the master race of Aryans. ...read more.

Conclusion

Stalin's fear was an additional reason why he signed the pact; he thought that the Western Powers with Germany were forming a block against him and if he had a treaty with Germany their plans wouldn't succeed. A further reason to keep in mind is that the Western Powers were not fully dedicated to accomplishing a reasonable treaty with the Soviets in 1939. This could be due to the fact that the Western Powers were in total opposition to communist Russia. The Nazi-Soviet non-aggression pact also provided Stalin with the advantages territorial gains and trade agreements. F Sources: Boyce R. & Roberson E. (1989). Paths to War. London: Macmillan Education ltd. Farmer Alan (2000). Modern European History 1890-1990. London: Hodder & Stoughton. Grey Ian (1982). Stalin -Man of Steel. Great Britain: Cox & Wyman Ltd. Kissinger, Henry. (1994). Diplomacy. New York: Simon& Schuster. Read A. & Fisher D. (1988). The Deadly Embrace. New York: W.W Norton & Company Reyner E.G. (1999). The Great Dictatorships: international relations 1918-39. London: Hodder & Stoughton. Vizulis Izidors (1988). The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939. New York: Praeger Publishers. 1 Grey Ian (1982). Stalin -Man of Steel. (Great Britain: Cox & Wyman Ltd.) 295. 2 IBID 296. 3 Vizulis Izidors (1988). The Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939. (New York: Praeger Publishers.) 19. 4 IBID 22 5 Grey 309 6 Read A. & Fisher D. (1988). (The Deadly Embrace. New York: W.W Norton & Company) 2 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Evaluate historical comparisons of Hitler and Stalin and their regimes

    Hitler became a member of the NSDAP when they were a relatively small and unknown party. He believed his oratorical skills and leadership was what developed the party. Hitler challenged the leader Drexler and become leader of the party in 1921.

  2. Why did Stalin sign the Nazi-Soviet Pact?

    Hitler, on the other hand, had already scheduled his strike on Poland- the 'blitzkrieg'- to be set off at the end of august, 1939. He wished for his plans to be safely implemented, and to prevent the risk of a consolidated alliance against him, since the British and French had ongoing negotiations with the Russians (at no hastiness, rather).

  1. Versailles Treaty- evaluation of sources

    admitting that Versailles had a grave impact on Germany would contradict her view that Versailles had little influence on the recovered Germany's oppressive attitude. She instead sees the treaty as a tool which Hitler used neatly in propaganda. This argument is correct as Hitler did use propaganda as a tactic

  2. Causes of show trials + purges of 1930s.

    If you wanted to join an association it had to be approved by the government otherwise you could be arrested. You could not set up your own business otherwise again you would be arrested or killed. If you were clever and you had a degree then you would be sent

  1. Why did the USSR sign an agreement with National Socialist Germany rather than Great ...

    o In September 1938, Stalin was not invited to the Munich Conference, attended by leaders of France, Britain, Germany and Italy. o During the night of September 29th 1938, Stalin called a Politburo meeting upon hearing of the Munich agreement.6 o On his first visit to the German Secretary of

  2. Hitlers Germany

    believe in his own magic, and accept the myth of himself as true, that his flair faltered. So much has been made of the charismatic nature of Hitter's leadership that it is easy to forget the astute and cynical politician in him.

  1. 'At Munich Hitler gained what he wanted and achieved conquest without firing a shot' ...

    have been the perfect/favourable time to do so, the conclusion of the speech suggests that war was not his objective. However Taylor does suggest that Hitler's fundamental aim was to destroy the Czech state by liberating the Sudeten Germans, however truly opportunist-like this aim lacked real plan.

  2. The Impact of Stalins Leadership in the USSR, 1924 1941. Extensive notes

    2. Some high-quality achievements e.g. in defence production. 3. The USSR became almost self-sufficient in some areas like machine tool production. 4. Some degree of industrial modernisation. 1. Not all targets were met, e.g. in the chemical industry, through inefficiency. 2. Although quality did improve, many products remained of poor quality.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work