• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Account For The Allied Victory In The Great War Of 1914

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Account for the allied victory in the Great War of 1914-1918 The allied victory in the Great War was almost inevitable when all circumstances are taken into account. The Prussian army which was the basis of the German war effort was by far the superior of most countries in Europe but it is delusional for it to have the ability to overpower their combined force especially when taking into account the strength of the Anglo-American relationship and the extent of the British empire. The allied forces ground the Germans to a near halt and gradually yet systematically drained them of the ability to fight. Although they showed signs of strain where never realistically going to lose. The Naval Blockade established after the naval battle of Jutland in 1916 was one of the pivotal points in the war. The battle was originally claimed as a success for both sides but in time it proved to be of far more significance to the Allied war efforts as although the battle itself saw larger losses for the British navy they were not defeated and their numbers and superiority forced a German retreat giving the Allies a crucial strategic victory. The Allies were now in control of the English Channel and the North Sea which they soon fortified with a large mining scheme. Control over these waters was crucial as it meant not only had Britain secured the safe passage of goods and men to and from the continent it was also able to halt all enemy supplies from the north, damaging both their economy and their war effort. ...read more.

Middle

"The Germans had more to celebrate. Russia had been knocked out of the struggle, and there were rumours of a planned attack in the West that would win the war." 4 P & D Snow It wasn't until the Russians collapsed on the Eastern front that German victory seemed a possibility and even this was for fortuitous reason. The Russian revolution or 1917 brought in the Bolshevik rulers who removed Russia from the war, rather than a victory on the part of the German. Nevertheless the necessity of protecting both fronts had demoralised and greatly weakened the war effort. The freedom offered after Russia's withdrawal though meant that they could now launch a serious western offensive; The Ludendorff offensives. American involvement towards the end of the war was of immeasurable benefit and was contestably the most important reason for allied victory in WW1. Originally being of passive assistance to the allies, through the supply of resources, the US had refused to get involved. Arguments with Germany over their unrestricted submarine warfare policy and the suspected sabotage of American munitions supplies had began to sway US military isolationism but it was the publishing of the decoded Zimmerman telegram which prompted official American involvement in the war. The US then committed to being an 'associate power' working alongside, but not with, the allies. The US entry into the war forced the German High Command into a desperate position, whereby they were forced to attempt the risky spring offensive of 1918. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Naval blockade had the effect of turning the German war effort into a finite source, they could not continue forever due to the strain it was putting on their economy and the fact that the lack of food was affecting not only the soldiers but the people at home. It was the issue however that the original power behind the German war effort was so great that it was placing a similar strain on the allied forces and it is likely that without firstly the seemingly infinite resources of the US and then later the relief offered by its massive military assistance that the allies would have been facing an equally perilous future with the continuation of conflict. Geoffrey Parker, 2005, The Cambridge History of Warfare, Cambridge university press, Cambrigde. James Joll, 1990, Europe since 1870: an international history, 4th edition, Penguin Books, London Peter and Dan Snow, 2008, 20th Century Battlefields, BBC Books, London. 03/12/08, http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Bunker/3017/tanks.html, historical article 03/12/08, http://www.helium.com/items/374808-allied-victory-in-the-great-war-of-1914-1918?page=2, Historical Article 1 Peter & Dan Snow, 20th Century Battlefields, pg. 20 2 James Joll, Europe Since 1870: An International History, pg. 209 3 Williamson A. Murray, Cambridge History of Warfare, Chapter 14, pg. 309 4 Peter & Dan Snow, 20th Century Battlefields, pg. 25 5 Adam White http://www.helium.com/items/374808-allied-victory-in-the-great-war-of-1914-1918?page=2 6 Battlefields Williamson A. Murray, Cambridge History of Warfare, Chapter 14, pg. 307 7 James Joll, Europe Since 1870: An International History, pg. 218 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. To what extent were technological changes the biggest feature in the changing nature of ...

    They were slow, vulnerable to attack, had low speeds and were prone to breaking down. At the battle of Cambrai 348 tanks were used and 300 broke down, however they did aid the preliminary barrage and many Germans fled the battle field, this shows that tanks had a more psychological

  2. Describe the D-day landings and evaluate their importance in the allied victory in WW2.

    The allies had control of the skies. The ratio was about 40:1. Having control of the skies is a huge advantage. It meant that the allies could bomb the German troops from the air and kill them as well as destroy munitions while the Germans could not do much against the aeroplanes.

  1. Vietnam war

    * Increasing centralisation, administrators replacing democratically elected village councils, purging of suspected communist/ Viet Cong activity. * Strategic Hamlet program= American support= Varyingly effective= greater discontent= 1960 suspension, but then new strategic hamlet program of relocation protected by ARVN= 3000 fortified villages by end of year.

  2. Hitlers Germany

    The Nazi accusations were unsophisticated but effective. Lower middle-class unemployed and employed embraced a Nazi party that promised to eliminate this corrupt Weimar system. The economic, social, and psychological crises created by the Great Depression had dire political consequences for Weimar democracy.

  1. HOW DID WORLD WAR ONE CONTRIBUTE TO THE TRANSFORMATION OF IRISH POLITICS 1914-1918?

    derives that "failure to harness the enthusiasm of the Volunteers not only damaged Irish recruitment but also helped drive the young men into the hands of militant nationalists."9 The transformation of British politics in May 1915 would again influence Irish Politics.

  2. To What Extent did Commandos contribute to final victory in World War Two

    Talking of the Madagascan invasion (by Commandos) 'it came at a dark time in the war for the Allied cause and was, Churchill later recalled, the only bright spot for Britain's war effort 'for some months''6. Harclerode and Reynolds argue "The concept of using Commando troops in an attack to

  1. Apeasement Did the policy of appeasement go to any great lengths toward stopping the ...

    These statements clearly act in favour of appeasement, expressing that military action against Germanys actions was not necessary as she is clearly retaliating against the unjust nature of the Versailles settlement, remilitarising her troops in a part of her own country was seen as no clear threat towards Britain and France.

  2. Did the policy of appeasement go to any great lengths toward stopping the outbreak ...

    However whilst acknowledging his army was in no position to withstand French opposition, Hitler ordered his troops to withdraw if such opposition occurred. The French however offered no such opposition. Instead the French sought the support of Britain, however the view that Germany had been to severely treated at Versailles

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work