• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Alfred the Great strikes back".

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Alfred the Great strikes back" By: Philip F. Cala III Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back" gives a lot of information on the life of Alfred the Great. It gives a good bit of information about his back ground and the way he ruled. In 878, he was a king without a kingdom, hunted in the marshes of Somerset. In the year 878, Danish forces had conquered most of England and driven the Saxon king of Wessex, Alfred, westward into the Somerset marshes. The second Danish army landed on the southwestern English coast and besieged a small Saxon force at Countisbury Hill. Then Alfred the Great planned to strike back with fellow Saxons who greeted him as if he had returned from the dead.1 If defeated, the remaining Saxons would be absorbed into the Danelaw. Alfred, with most of his allies having surrendered or fled to continental Europe, would be hunted down like a fugitive, and the history of the English would end. Alfred gathered his remaining forces and began a brilliant campaign that would enable him to reconquer his lands and resurrect a single English kingdom from the ashes of the old Anglo-Saxon nations2. ...read more.

Middle

Disheartened, the Danes returned north, driving the English from eastern Mercia and dividing the land among a new wave of Danish settlers. The lands held by the last English kingdom were too great a temptation for the Danes to resist for long, however. Then around 874 a warrior named Guthrum took control of the Danish forces. In January 878 he led them south to an attempt to capture Alfred during Christams in Chippenham, Wiltshire. Along the way, the Danes stopped at Countisbury Hill to crush a small fortress held by the Wessex ealdorman Odda. But Odda was a man inspired by God, according to Bishop Asser; he and his Saxons stormed out from his fortress early in the morning while the Danes slept, killed the Danish king and many of his forces, which saved Alfred from almost certain defeat. Alfred and a few of his men then ran to the Somerset marshes during the Christmas of 878, as the Danes took over all of Anglo-Saxon Britain. Alfred and his men built a bridge across the Parret and Tone Rivers to allow his men to hunt the game on the lands of the swaps3. ...read more.

Conclusion

He explains Alfred the Great very well. Michael Carr also gives a lot of information I did not know. Foe example In the year 878, Danish forces had conquered most of England and driven the Saxon king of Wessex, Alfred, westward into the Somerset marshes6 and that Alfred found respite behind the natural barrier formed by the Parret and Tone rivers, built a strong fort and raised a bridge across the river so his men could hunt the abundant game living in the surrounding forests7. This was a good article about Alfred the Great, it had a lot of information about his life and role in the 9th century. 1 Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back" pg 62 2 Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back"- pg 62 3 Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back"- pg 62 4 The Western Heritage 7th edition by Donald Kagan, Steven Ozment, and Frank M. Turner. Pg 241 5 Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back"- pg 62 6 Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back"- pg 62 7 Michael Carr's article "Alfred the Great strikes back"- pg 62 Cala 4 4 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work