• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Consequences of the Korean War.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Consequences of the Korean War There have been many discussions of what has happened to Americans since the end of the Korean War, but in states not much has been said about the state of Korea since the war. I find this quite interesting because South Korea was it's ally, not just another country they were at war with. To this day North and South Korea are still divided by the 38th parallel. After the war ended and the armistice was signed, North Koreans and South Koreans despised one another more than ever before. The North seeing most Southerners as "Japanese collaborators" during the Imperialist days from 1910 - 1945, and the South viewing the North as an uncontrollable militaristic bully. Immediately after the war, Syngman Rhee took control of the South Korean government and governed in such a manner that caused social unrest by the citizens of South Korea. ...read more.

Middle

Instead of developing a successful economic strategy as South Korea did, North Korea focused on its military by developing the power to create Nuclear weapons. This did get North Korea recognized, but not in the fashion that they had wished for. Today Kim Il Sung's son lead's North Korea in a similar manner as his father did before him. The country has been hit hard by famine and is basically in tatters. No one knows its next steps, but drastic measures will have to be made in order to bring back this country on the brink of disaster. Many historians consider the Korean War the "Forgotten War" or the "Unknown War" because it was extremely unpopular not only by ordinary citizens, but also most soldiers fighting in the war themselves. Some also touted it to be the first major U.S. military failure in history. Being overshadowed by World War II also contributed to one of many reasons why American soldiers were somehow forgotten when they arrived home from this operation. ...read more.

Conclusion

Vietnam, Kosovo, Bosnia, a number of mini-wars and even the recently erupted war with Iraq are some examples, just to name a few. Today many regard the United States as the world's police officer because the country is constantly fighting these U.N. peacekeeping missions. The Korean War proved to be the trendsetter for what has now become commonplace. Many question the United States responsibility to "police" every country in the world. Conclusion No one ever actually "wins" a war. And ironically, everyone involved in this war claimed to win in one fashion or another. I can only hope that wars such as this one can be somehow avoided in the future. Presently, the United States is still in a war of words with North Korea as President Bush demonstrated recently by saying the following: "I will remind the world that America will not allow North Korea and other dangerous regimes to threaten freedom with weapons of mass destruction." Hopefully someday both the United States and North Korea can come to terms and settle on a peaceful agreement. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. North Korea and South Korea after the Korean war.

    President Bush carelessly lumped North Korea in with the "Axis of Evil". This infuriated many Koreans on both sides including one South Korean parliamentary member who called Bush the "evil incarnate who wants to make the division of Korea permanent by branding North Korea part of the ?axis of evil".

  2. American History.

    based almost entirely on cotton. This was due to Eli Whitney's invention of the cotton gin in 1793, which separated short-staple [the easy to grow kind] cotton from its seeds efficiently. Although the South was in internat'l markets, it remained a rural society, w/most of the wealth in land and

  1. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    Damour was then transformed into a stronghold of Fatah and the PFLP (Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine). The massacre and destruction of Damour is best described by Becker in the book "The PLO". The massacre induced Muslims residing in Christian-dominated areas to flee to Muslim held areas, and vice versa.

  2. Alternatives to fossil fuels

    use of nuclear energy; enhance the use of nuclear energy security and persist the principle of use nuclear power. Bent, Orr and Baker (2002) claim that if national leaders explained the importance of developing a sustainable energy policy, and pushed hard for one, the people would follow their leadership.

  1. Bletchley park

    Source D and E are quite useful in helping us understand how B.P. was able to crack the Enigma Codes. Source D is much more useful than Source E for helping us understand the process involved in B.P. However these sources appear to be fairly limited.

  2. Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a ...

    30, 1945, with the Soviet troops just a few miles from Berlin, Hitler committed suicide. Peace in Europe followed shortly. The Pacific war continued, the Japanese home islands being rendered practically defenseless by July 1945. American aerial attacks burned out city after city.

  1. Bletchley Park

    spy in the German army and was able to compile enough information for a prototype to be built. This helped the British in a number of ways because it allowed the people at Bletchley Park to figure out how the rota settings worked and the settings for the machine to be cracked for the day.

  2. History of the United States

    Robbed of their enemy, Jeffersonian Democratic-Republicans broke into factions, effectively disappearing as a national party. AN AGE OF BOUNDLESSNESS: 1815-50 The volatile and expansive years from 1815 to 1850 were, in many ways, an age of boundlessness when limits that had previously curbed human aspirations seemed to disappear.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work