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Consider the relative importance of the British contribution to World War One compared with the French, Russian and American contributions.

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Introduction

Consider The Relative Importance Of The British Contribution To World War One Compared With The French, Russian And American Contributions. The results and consequences of World War I forever changed the 20th century in a way that the world had not expected. With ruins and deaths, as well as social change, World War I changed the worlds' outlook on European nations. The death toll of the wars fought in the previous one-hundred years did not touch the amount of deaths that resulted in World War I. Nearly ten million soldiers were lost in the four years that encompassed the war, and there were nearly twenty-one million men that were wounded. With these deaths came the mass destruction of land all across Europe. The fighting destroyed factories, farms, bridges, and railroad tracks. Due to artillery shells, chemical weapons, and trenches, the Western Front became barren. Military Strength Britain had a peacetime strength of 190,000 men and a colonial strength of 248,000 people. It had a wartime strength of 160,000 men in 1914. The total (army and naval) military personnel as a percentage of the population was 1.17% in 1913/14. Britain had a population of 46 million people and a colonial population of 434 million people where 6.430 million men were of military age of which only 248,000 were trained professionals equivalent to approximately 4-8 percent. ...read more.

Middle

The industrial strength of Russia was extremely weaker than the Central and Allied powers. She produced 36million tons of coal, 4million tons of iron and 4million tons of steel compared to 277million tons of coal, 15 million tons of iron and 14miullion tons of steel of Germany, or 292mmillion tons of coal, 11milliomn tons of iron and 6.5million tons of steel of Britain. Russia's expenditure was increasing from 1914/15 to 1916/17. However, it decreased in 1917/18. it was $1.239 in 1914/15, $3.18 in 1915/16 and $4.585million and in 1916/17, it decreased to $2.774million, the total expenditure worth $11,778million. France had 40million tons of coal, but had only 5million tons of iron and 35million tons of steels, which was quite low. France's expenditure was increasing throughout the war. In 1914/15, they spent$1.994million, in 1915/16, $3.827million, in 1916.17, $6.227million, in 1917/18, $7.74 million and in 1918/19, $10.16million giving a total of $30,009million, the third largest amount of the Central and Allied powers, showing that France was fully stretched in terms of economic power. France borrowed money from Britain and USA, while lending money to Russia and other countries. A higher level of external finance certainly helped Britain and France to spend more on waging war than Germany and Austria-Hungary. USA............................................................................................................ Analysis of the contribution of each country The contribution made in 1914 In 1914, Britain made the largest contribution out of all the Allies, even though it was quite small. ...read more.

Conclusion

The U.S armaments continued to be vital to the Allies. . U.S shipbuilding was vital to overcome losses of merchant ships to German U Boats. The contributions made in 1918 In 1918 Britain made the largest contribution between the Allies. The Hindenburg line was the strongest German defensive position. This line helped in the German Spring Offensive but Britain managed to stop it. Britain had captured more German prisoners than France and America put together this year. Britain were still dependent on U.S loans. Britain was the main cause for the defeat of the German Allies (Bulgaria, Austria-Hungary and Turkey). Britain had mobilised 5,680,247 in the army. They made an economic contribution of $12,611,000,000 this year. In 1918 France still had more men on the Western front than America, Britain and France put together because they needed each other to survive the German Spring Offensive. France made the second largest contribution this year. They made an economic contribution of $10,166,000,000 this year. In the middle of 1918 U.S.A had around 3,000,000 men in Europe but they were inexperienced. They launched their first major attack at Argonne in September 1918. The significance of this was that it lifted the Allied powers morale greatly. They made the largest economic contribution as well as lending huge loans to France and Britain. By the end of 1918 U.S.A was the leading nation. In the last two years the U.S.A contributed a total of $35,731,000,000 which was more than all the allies. 1 Hasan Khizar History Coursework ...read more.

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