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Describe Italy's invasion of Abyssinia in 1935-6 and what the League of Nations did about it.

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Introduction

Describe Italy's invasion of Abyssinia in 1935-6 and what the League of Nations did about it. During the years of 1935 and 1936 Italy had a new ruler, Benito Mussolini. Mussolini wanted and empire in Eastern Africa. For there had already been disputes of Ethiopia and the Italian Somaliland in Africa and during 1930-35 Italian soldiers had been killed by Abyssinians on the border. Mussolini thought that would be the perfect to attack and Abyssinia would mean a fairly easy victory and that he will have his empire that little bit sooner. ...read more.

Middle

Once they retreated the Abyssinia leader, Haile Selassie went to the League of Nations for help. The League had failed to help when they where last asked for assistance. This was when Manchuria needed aid when Japan was threatening to attack and did in 1931. The league had to keep to a strict plan and needed to impose moral sanctions upon Italy. This is when the country attacking is reminded of the covenant they signed and is asked to back down. ...read more.

Conclusion

Britain and France the most powerful countries in the league didn't want to upset Mussolini for Hitler was coming to power at that time and if Mussolini was an ally of Britain and France that would be a good weapon against Germany. As they did not want to offend Mussolini the league also refused to close to Suez canal. This was meant for Italian shipping but could also be used to transport troops. This lead to Abyssinia to be under more pressure. The Suez runs between Sinai and Egypt, and from the Mediterranean to the Red sea and is controlled by the British and French. ...read more.

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