• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Describe the methods used by the Abolitionist movement in their campaign against slavery in the 1840s and 1850s.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Describe the methods used by the Abolitionist movement in their campaign against slavery in the 1840s and 1850s. Abolitionists used many different ways to get their point across, and try to make changes to the allowance of slavery in the United States of America. One of the more radical, even fanatical abolitionists was John Brown. This man did not plan carefully; he was almost certainly psychotic; yet he is remembered to this day in the song 'John Brown's Body', therefore he must have made an impact on the views of people about slavery. He was very violent - in 1856 he had five pro-slavery men butchered on Pottawotamie Creek. However, Northerners glossed over the murders, claiming Brown was a hero who had acted in self defence. This started up a bout of 'tit-for-tat' killings. ...read more.

Middle

She led 300 slaves to freedom, and was aptly named the 'Moses of her people'. Her solution was not really practical long term as it didn't resolve the issue of slavery, but it certainly helped many of the slaves to gain their freedom, and gave others hope. Slaveholders obviously thought of her as a great threat, offering $40,000 for her return, so she must have made an impact on the slave community. The abolitionist that brought the most attention and publicity to the conditions of the slaves, and gained the most sympathy for them was without a doubt Harriet Beecham Stowe. She was a married white woman, who in 1850 wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin', originally as a serial in an anti-slavery newspaper, but when she released it as a book in 1852, it sold 300,000 copies in the first year, and over the next ten years, 2,000,000. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although its circulation was only 3000 (and 75% of the buyers were freed slaves), it showed that there were people who made the effort to bring the issue to the attention of the American public. There were also some black men like Frederick Douglas, who toured the country, seeking sympathy to their cause. He in particular was the son of a slave in Maryland, self-educated who toured the USA and later England, making speeches on behalf of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. This was one of the many abolitionist societies. I do not think that there was one method that worked better than another as they all made quite different impacts to the anti-slavery cause. Some were long term, some were short term; some were peaceful, some were violent; some used words and others used actions. Some got publicity; some achieved freedom for some slaves - but as all of them have been remembered today, they must have made an effect on the movement, and so their actions ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Revision notes - the USA 1945 to 1980

    Eventually in 1973, most US soldiers had gone. To help achieve this he ordered the Bombing of North Vietnam and ordered secret bombing campaigns in Cambodia in1969 and later escalated the conflict with secretly bombing Laos before Congress cut the funding for the conflict in Vietnam. Detente Nixon's second great policy achievement was the changing relationship with the

  2. What was the short term significance of settlement in Kansas in the 1850s and ...

    This violence would soon seep out of congress and into Kansas. Violence in congress was apparent in the case of 'Bleeding Sumner'. In this instant Southern Congressman Preston Brooks brutally beat Northern senator Sumner because of his ideas concerning anti-slavery.

  1. The abolition of slavery 1833.

    Lots of black slaves who worked in Britain started to demand wages from their owners and to be treated like normal servants. Olaudah Equiana was a slave who in 1789 wrote his autobiography. When he was ten he was taken from his home in Africa and brought to Barbados as a slave.

  2. Abolishing slavery.

    of paying wages (a southern argument), the idea of slavery was detestation to God's will, and such moralistic appeals began to breed. Theodore S. Wright, a clergyman, called slavery "nefarious and wicked" and said that God would never save anyone who believed that Black people were lesser human beings than

  1. The Underground Railroad

    Directions to stations were hidden in the lyrics of songs. "Follow the Drinking Gourd" was a song with lyrics advising slaves to stay close to riverbanks and that two rivers would be crossed during the journey. Once slaves arrived at a safe house, they used special knocks or passwords to

  2. Harriet Beecher Stowe influenced many Americans to join the abolitionist movement and ultimately caused ...

    was able to see race riots, terrified runaway slaves, bounty hunters, and suffering freed people ("Uncle Tom's Cabin").

  1. What did the Compromise of 1850 offer to people who supported slavery? What did ...

    John C. Calhoun represented the South's case for slavery in territories. Daniel Webster gave his speech three days later, which appealed for national unity. In his speech he warned Southerner's about the dangers of succession. Webster's speech became very famous in the history of the Senate.

  2. The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano - overview

    writing that he was an equal person that possessed all the abilities of any of his masters, but their were people that were not ready to accept this reality. Equiano's images of suffering were often relayed to the reader as he observed them and not as he experienced them.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work