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Do you agree that Hitler's Foreign Policy appears to be following a traditional foreign policy?

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Introduction

Do you agree that Hitler's Foreign Policy appears to be following a traditional foreign policy? Hitler's foreign policy seemed to be more aggressive than the traditional foreign policies in Germany, but was this in fact the case? Neil Gregor: 'Hitler's foreign policy looked like a continuation of the expansionist policies of Bismarck and the Kaiser. But were appearances deceptive? Traditional foreign policies are defined as those that had gone before (in Imperial Germany and Weimar Germany). Hitler was heavily involved himself in the all important foreign policy decisions Goring said at the time ''Foreign Policy above all was the F�hrer's own realm' Although there are a lot of similarities to the traditional foreign policies, it is not completely true to say Hitler's foreign policy was 'traditional'. Hitler's foreign policy had its own unique part, in the racial motivation for his policies of Lebensraum (Living Space) and Weltherschaft (World Domination) based on Hitler's belief in Social Darwinism, which is Hitler's Worldview (weltanshauung), that the world is divided into races, and the Aryan race was the superior race. ...read more.

Middle

The only difference between the two menwas how where motivated. When the Kaiser was motivated by his envy of Great Britain's Empire and navy, he wanted this status for Germany. Hitler was motivated by his racial policies. There were also similarities between the foreign policy of Weimar Germany and Hitler's Foreign Policy. Weimar Germany had began to revise the Treaty of Versailles, and Stresemann had began the reduction in the reparations payments after World War One. Stresemann had agreed to the Dawes Plan, in 1924, which agreed that reparation's payment's should begin at 1 billion marks for the first year and should rise over a period of four years to 2.5 billion marks per year although this did not work and so was soon substituted by the Young Plan. In this it was agreed that reparations payments would be paid in one unconditional sum (one third of the total) and then a postponed part (the remainder) Br�ning, a member of Weimar Government ended reparations payments in 1932, just before the Nazis came to power. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also signed the Anglo-German Naval agreement, allowing Germany to have 35% of the number of members in the British Navy, in its own Navy. This annoyed France and led to the break-up of the Stresa Front. Hitler also wanted to expand to the east, to gain more 'Lebensraum' and to unite all Germans in the one country, which Stresemann had also wanted to do. Stresemann wanted to help all the Germans who had been forced, by the Treaty of Versailles to live in other countries. Hitler had targeted Czechoslovakia, Poland and Russia to name a few countries in the east. Hitler wanted to expand Germany to be not only a huge superpower but be in domination of the entire world for 1000 years in the 'one thousand year Reich'. Some of the people who were members of the Weimar Government continued into the Nazi Government. Von Neurath, who had been foreign minister, during Weimar Germany, continued on until 1938, under the Nazi Government. Blomberg and Fritsch, both served under the Weimar and the Nazi Government until 1938. Von Papen(who had been Chancellor from 1932-33) after Hitler became Chancellor was part on the Nazi Government post 1933. 29/30, Need to improve on conclusion and introduction LY! ...read more.

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