• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Do you agree that Hitler's Foreign Policy appears to be following a traditional foreign policy?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Do you agree that Hitler's Foreign Policy appears to be following a traditional foreign policy? Hitler's foreign policy seemed to be more aggressive than the traditional foreign policies in Germany, but was this in fact the case? Neil Gregor: 'Hitler's foreign policy looked like a continuation of the expansionist policies of Bismarck and the Kaiser. But were appearances deceptive? Traditional foreign policies are defined as those that had gone before (in Imperial Germany and Weimar Germany). Hitler was heavily involved himself in the all important foreign policy decisions Goring said at the time ''Foreign Policy above all was the F�hrer's own realm' Although there are a lot of similarities to the traditional foreign policies, it is not completely true to say Hitler's foreign policy was 'traditional'. Hitler's foreign policy had its own unique part, in the racial motivation for his policies of Lebensraum (Living Space) and Weltherschaft (World Domination) based on Hitler's belief in Social Darwinism, which is Hitler's Worldview (weltanshauung), that the world is divided into races, and the Aryan race was the superior race. ...read more.

Middle

The only difference between the two menwas how where motivated. When the Kaiser was motivated by his envy of Great Britain's Empire and navy, he wanted this status for Germany. Hitler was motivated by his racial policies. There were also similarities between the foreign policy of Weimar Germany and Hitler's Foreign Policy. Weimar Germany had began to revise the Treaty of Versailles, and Stresemann had began the reduction in the reparations payments after World War One. Stresemann had agreed to the Dawes Plan, in 1924, which agreed that reparation's payment's should begin at 1 billion marks for the first year and should rise over a period of four years to 2.5 billion marks per year although this did not work and so was soon substituted by the Young Plan. In this it was agreed that reparations payments would be paid in one unconditional sum (one third of the total) and then a postponed part (the remainder) Br�ning, a member of Weimar Government ended reparations payments in 1932, just before the Nazis came to power. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also signed the Anglo-German Naval agreement, allowing Germany to have 35% of the number of members in the British Navy, in its own Navy. This annoyed France and led to the break-up of the Stresa Front. Hitler also wanted to expand to the east, to gain more 'Lebensraum' and to unite all Germans in the one country, which Stresemann had also wanted to do. Stresemann wanted to help all the Germans who had been forced, by the Treaty of Versailles to live in other countries. Hitler had targeted Czechoslovakia, Poland and Russia to name a few countries in the east. Hitler wanted to expand Germany to be not only a huge superpower but be in domination of the entire world for 1000 years in the 'one thousand year Reich'. Some of the people who were members of the Weimar Government continued into the Nazi Government. Von Neurath, who had been foreign minister, during Weimar Germany, continued on until 1938, under the Nazi Government. Blomberg and Fritsch, both served under the Weimar and the Nazi Government until 1938. Von Papen(who had been Chancellor from 1932-33) after Hitler became Chancellor was part on the Nazi Government post 1933. 29/30, Need to improve on conclusion and introduction LY! ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Mussolini's foreign policy.

    3 star(s)

    Only weeks after the Corfu incident, Mussolini sent a military officer to govern the city of Fiume, which he claimed was falling into anarchy. Mussolini managed to secure an agreement with Yugoslavia in January 1924 in the Pact of Rome in which Fiume was annexed to the Italian state.

  2. In 1933, Hitler’s main aim in foreign policy was cancelling the treaty of Versailles, ...

    This put Britain in a risky position as firstly this was very much against the TOV and it also shows that Britain was in favour of proposed German rearmament programs. Resulting from this pact, France and Italy both dropped any planned for action that they had in mind.

  1. "The most important aim of foreign policy 1933-1936 was to overthrow the terms of ...

    The Stresa Front as it came to be known proved to be quite unsuccessful as in 1935 Britain and Germany signed the Anglo-German Naval Agreement, which guaranteed Britain naval superiority. It also allowed Germany to build up its navy up to 36% in size of that of the British and also allowed submarines to be built and included as well.

  2. To what extent was Bismarck in control of the direction Germany's Foreign Policy took ...

    Hereafter Bismarck reveals his ignorance of world affairs. Moreover Taylor writes, "the days of European upheaval were over; they would not come again until one of the powers felt itself strong enough to challenge the balance which had been established at the congress of Berlin."

  1. Hitlers Germany

    Half of Britain's mercantile fleet had been sent to the bottom. The financial system had been destroyed and international trade completely disrupted. Some currencies collapsed completely and inflation got out of hand in many countries: in Hungary one American dollar was worth 11 sextillion pengoes.

  2. Mussolinis’s Foreign Policy

    Adriatic, given that the Greek government seemed to refuse to pay the 50 million lira compensation they asked for the assassination of an Italian general and his staff, who were mapping out for an international inter-allied Commission the new Greek- Albanian frontier on Greek territory.

  1. Hitler(TM)s single aim in foreign policy was to expand in the east. Do you ...

    Throughout Hitler's Foreign policy, his aims and objectives remained constant and clear. They were clearly expressed in Mien Kampf and speeches. Hitler despised the Treaty Of Versailles and saw it as a humiliation for Germany. He promised if he came to power that he would tear up the Treaty, end

  2. "Kaiser Wilhelm II used to the full his authority as Kaiser of the German ...

    parliamentary allies, as this was the only way Wilhelm could ever achieve a level of authority that resembled personal rule. Again, Wilhelm's fight against socialism was one of his biggest failures in terms of achieving personal rule. The Prussian Suffrage Bill, of 1910, was a complete disaster for Bethmann and

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work