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Do you agree with the view that, by 1914, the changes to the law governing married life represented a formidable record of improvement.

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Introduction

Do you agree with the view that, by 1914, the changes to the law governing married life represented a 'formidable record of improvement'. Marriage and divorce Sources 18 completely agrees with the statement that the changes in law governing married life represented a 'formidable record of improvement' by 1914. This source states various acts which have been passed to enable the record of improvement formidable. This source was published in 1992, which was after 1914 suggesting that changes to the law which had been made regarding married life was a 'formidable record of improvement' as there were acts which had been passed in favour of the statement preventing the husband in a married relationship to do certain things with their wife. 'The catalogue of reforms and advances for married women before 1914' this shows that there were acts which had been introduced before 1914 which proved that the changes to law governing married life was a 'formidable record of improvement' due to the acts passed which were evidence of this. From my own knowledge, Josephine Butler can be linked to this source as her husband agreed with her views. Josephine's husband had similar views to her who had strong views about the wrongs of inequality and injustice and the need for social reform. ...read more.

Middle

This case enabled the marital law to be introduced which prevented wife-battering and marital rape as this law specified that a husband did not have complete control over his wife showing that changes to the law governing married life had started to take place after the introduction of this law. Custody of children Source 16 is a source that completely disagrees with the statement to the changing of law governing married life. 'No legal right to a voice' this shows that a woman has no right to say what they want or how they want their life to run. This agrees with the fact that women should remain silent and their husbands should make their decisions as they are head of the family. This quote refers to the 'Angel in the House' concept that women have no say in politics and should remain within the home to look after the children and do household chores without any relation to politics in the outside world. This source shows that by 1914, there were no changes to the law in governing married life which shows that the rules and regulations remained the same and there were no changes which would aid women to go outside of their home and take part in things which were only addressed to men such as work and the equality between the sexes. ...read more.

Conclusion

Caroline Norton was an important figurehead of the time as her biography of her life became evidence for many people to approve their view that by 1914, the changes to the law governing married life was no a 'formidable record of improvement' as the relationship between Caroline and her husband did not show this. The reason being that Caroline was unable to receive the custody of her children and her husband beat her on many occasions showing that there were still no changes to the law governing married life by 1914. Conclusion In conclusion, I believe that by 1914, the changes to the law governing married life did not represent a 'formidable record of improvement' hence I disagree with the statement. I have this view because after 1914, there was still evidence that changes to the law governing married life had not change significantly. The changes which had been made, by introducing acts and laws which forbid the husband to do certain things with their wives after they were married were the only changes made but there were not many of these changes. The changes made were only minor and in many places there had been no changes to the law governing married life showing that the changes which had been made were not a 'formidable record of improvement.' ?? ?? ?? ?? Zaira Khalid 12C ...read more.

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