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Essay plan Which of the following marked the start of the Cold War: Churchill's Iron Curtain Speech (1946), the Truman Doctrine (1947) or the Berlin Blockade (1948- 49)? Explain your answer

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Introduction

History Essay Theme: The Cold War Topic: The Origins of the Cold War Qn 2: Which of the following marked the start of the Cold War: Churchill's Iron Curtain Speech (1946), the Truman Doctrine (1947) or the Berlin Blockade (1948- 49)? Explain your answer. OUTLINE: Introduction- 1. Definition of 'Cold War' and the Powers involved 2. Perceived definition of 'start of Cold War' 3. Iron Curtain Speech, Truman Doctrine and Berlin Blockade as significant events that caused strife between both powers, but which triggering off the start of the Cold War Body- 1. Iron Curtain Speech (1946) - A warning of Soviet influence beyond the acknowledged Eastern Europe - Churchill's belief that the idea of a balance in power does not appeal to the Soviets - Wants Western democracies to stand together ...read more.

Middle

Response to Iron Curtain Speech was that the Soviets felt it was meant to 'sow seeds of dissension among the Allied states'; the Soviets still considered the Western powers as Allies. 2. Truman Doctrine (1947) - Open and direct confrontation of Soviets Calls the Soviets: 'political oppression', 'suppression of personal freedoms', 'evil' - Policy of US to support people who resist attempted subjugation by 'outside pressure' which meant the Soviets - The need to assist the 'free' people - Sees the Soviet as the enemy. - The first concrete and coherent American foreign policy towards the USSR. USSR Reaction: No immediate official response from the Soviet government. However, a few months later, the Soviet 'Two Camps Speech' emerged stating Soviet stand. ...read more.

Conclusion

well as supplies of food, electricity, gas and other necessities to starve the West Berliners into submission - Soviets did not want the prospect of an economic recovery in West Germany as it revived fears of invasion from the West - Western powers' zone in Berlin lay within Soviet occupation zone; Soviets wished to use Berlin to pressure the Western powers from creating the separatist Western German state whereby the Soviets held no power - If this failed, at least the Western powers' zones in Berlin would belong to the Soviets. Western Reaction: Airlift was used to send all supplies. Highly successful and was considered as a major victory for the Americans when the Soviets found that the blockade was no effective in starving the West Berliners into submission and ended the blockade. ...read more.

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