• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain Lenin's contribution to the development of the Bolshevik Party up to and including April 1917.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

History Coursework: the significance of Lenin in the Bolshevik Revolution (1917-1923) a) Explain Lenin's contribution to the development of the Bolshevik Party up to and including April 1917. In most cases, in order for a group of people to function efficiently and successfully, there must be a `leader'. Someone that takes charge, guides, supports and encourages everyone else. In politics particularly, it is important that this person has certain qualities, as not everyone is `a born leader'. They must be able to make people want to join their party, they should be able to give speeches, and lead demonstrations. They are mostly very ambitious and self-righteous people, who know what they want; they usually have quite unique and strong ideas. For the Bolshevik Party, this person was Lenin. Vladimir Illyich Ulyanov, otherwise known as Lenin, was born in 1870; he had two brothers, and three sisters. His favourite brother, `Sasha' was hung in 1887 for being part of a plot to kill the Tsar, Alexander III; Lenin was only 17 at the time. This event obviously had a dramatic effect on Lenin's life, and ideas. It stirred up a lot of resentment towards Tsarism as he blamed the Tsar for his brothers' death and so he became very anti-Tsarist. ...read more.

Middle

Maybe one of the most important qualities that a leader should have, is to be able to encourage other people to achieve their goals (usually they all have the same objective). A leader should be able to make other people believe in themselves. Lenin did all of this helping his party to thrive and become more successful. He was actively involved in the Bolshevik party; he was the editor of the party newspaper `Vpeyrod', `Forward'. Many people believe that the Bolshevik paper was named `Iskra', `The Spark', but in fact this remained the Menshevik newspaper. In `Vpeyrod' Lenin was able to print his ideas. This meant that other people could read about them, and hopefully relate to what he was saying, after all it was in a similar way that Lenin himself was introduced to his beliefs. Although the Bolshevik party was very important to Lenin, he was not actually in Russia for most of the time leading up to the 1917 revolution. He lived in different European cities, planning a revolution instead of actually being part of one. However, when news reached him of the revolution, he immediately returned to Russia, and was greeted by his party. ...read more.

Conclusion

He persuaded some Russian millionaires to back the party, however the other ways in which money was raised were more violent and also illegal. There were many Bolshevik robberies, where gangs of members of the party robbed shops and post offices. Lenin was also the person who decided where the money would be spent. He put a lot of the money into printing the newspaper and other revolutionary literature. In this case his contribution the party was that he was not only the leader of the party, but the `idea man'. He controlled the finances, just as he controlled the party - without his financial support and ideas, the party would have been much weaker. At the time the only publicity that the party was getting was via the paper and any books Lenin was publishing. Without this the party wouldn't of been able to `spread the word' and allow other people to read about what they were trying to achieve and why they were trying to achieve it. So in conclusion, Lenin made a lot of very important contributions to the Bolshevik Party. Without him, there probably wouldn't of even been a Bolshevik party, as it was his convictions, his courage and his longing for the world he believed would make everyone happy, that not only started the party, but kept it going. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Lenin and the Bolshevik revolution.

    A further 100,000 men were garrisoned in and around Moscow, and 32,000 soldiers and sailors were stationed at Kronstadt. For the most part the men of the garrisons were either over or under age, or else recovering from wounds. They were mostly peasant in background and thus many of them

  2. Russia 1905-1941 'Explain how the unpopularity of the Provisional Government contributed to the Bolshevik ...

    Karl Marx, the idealist in whom Marxism originated, believed Russia would go through a capitalist period and a proletarian period, when a revolution would occur. The leap from Tsarism to a proletarian period on the far left would have been too great for the Russian public to realise, without a 'stepping stone' in between.

  1. Why were there two revolutions in Russiain 1917?

    Quickly emerging as the new leader, Alexander Kerensky's announced two goals: offensive against the Central Powers and democratic reorganization of the military command. Kerensky's "Declaration of Soldiers Rights" on May 22 included the appointment of commissars in the army to handle soldiers councils, but the councils issued orders contradicting the commanders and thus undermined the officer corps.

  2. The Bolshevik revolution

    On January 18-19, the Constituent assembly met, and there was wide spread criticism of the Bolshevik usurpation of power. Red guards and groups of sailors under Lenin's orders dissolved the constituent assembly and single party state was formed. Despite minority support, they did have the support of the armed forces, which meant that they were able to stay in power.

  1. The significance of Lenin in the Bolshevik Revolution (1917-1923).

    Down to 1914, the Bolsheviks hadn't had much success, as all opposition groups had been surpressed by the Tsar. The 1905 revoltuion after the defeat to Japan led to four different Dumas being created but none of these had any real success.

  2. The Significance of Lenin in the Bolshevik Revolution (1917-1923)

    Lenin timed this well as the Russians were becoming very discontented with the Tsarist government. A war between Russia and Japan had broken out and the Russians were losing battle after battle. Lenin hoped that Vperyod would fuel the feelings of discontent until it ruptured into a revolution led by himself and his party.

  1. Explain Lenin's Contribution to the Development of the Bolshevik Party, up to and including ...

    speech were written up and called the 'April Theses' One non-Bolshevik Socialist described Lenin's speech: "...Suddenly, before the eyes of all of us, completely swallowed up by the routine drudgery of the Revolution, there was presented a bright blinding, exotic beacon...Lenin's voice heard straight from the train, was a 'voice from outside'."

  2. How significant was Lenin between the years 1902-1918 to the formation of the Bolshevik ...

    help the two of them drove the rest of the members to their point of view. The following resolution document commanded ?that the time for it [the revolution] is fully ripe?28 and an uprising is ?inevitable?29(see source 5), possibly implying that the other Bolsheviks of the board were thinking about, if not planning a future uprising.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work