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Explain the role played by the Duke of Northumberland in the Edwardian religious reforms of 1550-1553

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Introduction

Transfer-Encoding: chunked Explain the role played by the Duke of Northumberland in the Edwardian religious reforms of 1550-1553 (12) When John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, gained power in 1550 after the fall of Somerset, religious reform in England and Wales became more radical. Some historians say that Northumberland advanced Protestantism not because he was a great reformer but to advance his career. Since Northumberland had gained power because of the Reform faction, he had to deliver greater reform. AGR Smith said Northumberland?s religious settlement, ??committed England clearly and unequivocally to the Protestant camp.? Up to 1552 a number of ceremonial changes were made with a more Protestant form of worship and belief being established after 1552. ...read more.

Middle

It became the official basis for church services and had to be used by both clergy and laity. Its teachings included a Eucharist ceremony in line with Calvin?s belief in a ?spiritual presence?, the abolition of the Mass, replacing colourful robes with plain surplice and abolishing the sign of the cross at confirmation. Furthermore, the Eucharist was now called the Lord?s Supper and the wording of the service stressed the ceremony was a memorial service ? Communicants took the bread in remembrance of Christ?s suffering and death. This officially replaced transubstantiation with consubstantiation. There was still a real presence of Christ in the heart of a true believer. ...read more.

Conclusion

In particular his contentious idea of predestination now became part of the English churches? theology. It also proclaimed the centrality of the Bible to matters of doctrine, ceremony and salvation. It never became law. To conclude, Northumberland made radical changes, but many were not in force for very long (such as the 48 articles). It is generally agreed that by 1553 the Edwardian Reformation had resulted in a Church of England that was thoroughly Protestant but there is insufficient evidence to decide whether the people of England had wholeheartedly embraced Protestantism. According to GR Elton, ?The Edwardian Reformation was superficial ? imposed on a reluctant or indifferent people by a few ardent spirits and the politicians.? ...read more.

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