• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Falklands War

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Is the Falklands War a just war? The Falkland Islands were owned by the British until 2nd April 1982 when the Argentineans invaded the islands without a warning. Up until the invasion, very few people could have pointed out the small islands on a map. For the next 10 weeks the Falkland's 1,800 inhabitants found themselves the focus of the world's attention. For the Argentines the British possession of the islands - which they called the Malvinas - was a long standing affront to national pride. They traced their claim back to the days of the Spanish empire, of which both the Falklands and Argentina had been a part. The decision to use force instead of diplomacy was taken by Argentina's brutal military Junta. It hoped to use the nationalist fervour a short successful war would arouse to divert attention from the country's shattered economy. According to the list of conditions for a just war; it was right for the British to start a war against the Argentineans. ...read more.

Middle

The lawful authority for this case was the British government. The UN also can be counted as an authority but some people argue against this. None the less, there was at least one lawful authority. According to the list of conditions for a just war; the British had a good and bad intention for the war. The condition that it falls into is 'The intention behind the war must be good'. The British had one bad intention which they probably knew, behind the war and had one good intention: 1. The British were not trying to injure or kill any of the innocent inhabitants living on the islands. 2. The British were trying to gain national glory and be the centre of attention in the world. According to the list of conditions for a just war; the British should try to the resolve the problem in a different way but war. The condition that it falls into is 'All other ways of resolving problems should be tried first'. ...read more.

Conclusion

The condition that it falls into is 'The means used must be in proportion to the end that the war seeks to achieve'. The British did eventually win the war due to a resignation by the Argentineans. They ended the war straight away as soon as they won it and had achieved their intention. They did not want to kill innocent people. The Falklands War was nearly a Just War. The British had fought the war for a just cause/s. The war was lawfully declared by lawful authority e.g. government. There were no other ways of trying to resolve the war but peace which the British did first but the Argentines did not agree so the only other choice was war. The British also ended the war as soon as they had won the war and the Argentines had resigned. The intention behind the war was good but they were trying to gain national glory. There was not a reasonable chance of success as they were fighting over 8000 miles from home. Dhruvin Patel ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    No investigation was carried out into the murder. The parliament met on November 24 in the Beqaa Valley and elected Elias Hrawi, a Maronite Christian deputy from Zahleh in the Beqaa Valley, to replace him. The results of the election were broadcast on Syrian radio ten minutes before the vote actually took place.

  2. Describe the historical claims of Britain and Argentina to the Falkland Islands

    Although Argentina has claimed the Falkland Islands since the early 19th century, Britain has occupied and managed the islands since 1833. In 1892 the UK granted the Islands colonial status. In 1964, the position of the islands was debated by the UN Committee on Decolonisation.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work