• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Henry VII achieved the aims of his foreign policy. Comment

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Henry VII achieved the aims of his foreign policy. Comment H enry VII thought an effective foreign policy was essential in the governing and security of the realm. Henry believed that a good foreign policy meant security, recognition and prosperity. Security: Henry thought it very important to prevent other powers from harbouring pretenders to the English throne. Recognition: the beginning of the new Tudor dynasty had to be accepted over seas. This gave Henry a secure position on his throne and the family marriages in Spain and Scotland were vital in his process to achieve international respectability. Prosperity: Henry knew that a rich king was better respected than a poor one. He was anxious to fill his pockets with foreign money and improve the trading of England's merchants. A successful example of this being the treaty of Etaples in 1492 with France giving Henry a �5000 pension paid to him every year for the rest of his reign. Henry VII had several areas that he needed to concentrate on in order to prevent any clashes with foreign powers: France, Spain, Burgundy, Scotland and Ireland. Each had its own problems, which Henry was quick to resolve, and in some cases, make money from. ...read more.

Middle

In a revival of the League of Cambrai, the Pope, Louis XII of France, Emperor Maximillian, Charles of Burgundy and Ferdinand of Aragon had joined against Venice. Yet again England is left out and isolated, leaving Henry very safe indeed. E arly in the 15th Century, Burgundy had established itself as independent from France and in 1435 allied itself with Yorkist England. Edward IV had strengthened the alliance in the 1460's. This alliance was useful to Edward as Burgundy helped him take control of England after hearing that France had sided with the Lancastrians and wanted to incorporate Burgundy back into France. Burgundy continued to support the house of York providing a safe place for Yorkist pretenders to seek refuge whilst gathering support to take the throne of England. Margaret of Burgundy was the key figure in these actions. A wealthy and powerful woman, she provided the financial backing for pretenders, two particular individuals who had substantial backing from her were Lambert Simnel and Perkin Warbeck. The Treaty of Windsor was signed between Philip of Burgundy and Henry VII. The treaty meant that Henry would recognise Philip and his wife Joanna King and Queen of Castile. In return, Henry would marry Philip and Joanna's daughter solidifying the relationship between the two countries. ...read more.

Conclusion

Later in 1509, complete control if Ireland was returned to the Irish. T o conclude, all of Henry's frankly brilliant foreign policies were a success. In France he had prevented them from harbouring rebels and pretenders to the throne, he also got a �5000 pension from them each year with the Treaty of Etaples. Spain was a similar situation, a powerful country that would be dangerous if made an enemy. Peace by marriage between Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII was successful and once more Spain could not provide refuge for pretenders to Henry's throne. Yorkist Burgundy was kept away with the Treaty of Windsor and Scotland was kept at peace with the Treaty of Ayton, which included the section where they could not harbour pretenders or rebels. Ireland, a vast expanse of countryside ideal for Yorkists to hide in was not such a success as Henry was unable to establish control over it. However, he had insured the loyalty of the Desmond, Kildare and Ormund families by pardoning the Earl of Kildare after he ignored the arrival of Perkin Warbeck to his shores. All told, Henry was at peace with Europe, Ireland and Scotland through various treaties, marriages and truces. He was also somewhat isolated from the rest of Europe, but was this advantageous? He was left alone to do his own business and did not concern the major powers on the continent. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How successful was English foreign policy in the years 1509 1529?

    4 star(s)

    Because France and the Holy Roman Emperor Charles had made peace, no one was willing to help free the Pope - held captive since Charles sacked Rome in 1527. This meant that although Wolsey had made numerous attempts to utilize Foreign Policy in order to secure an annulment for Henry, by 1929 his attempts had remained fruitless.

  2. Essay: How serious was the Yorkist threat to Henry VII?

    Compared to the other two major conspiracies we can say that the Perkin Warbeck affair was a lot more serious, but in other ways we can say that it was not as much of a threat to Henry as

  1. How far did Henry VIII achieve his aims 1509 - 1514?

    Apart from this minor failure, the way Henry handled the nobles and the Yorkist threat was a success because he had already established Yorkist friends, he acted in a strong way to any outstanding Yorkist supporters, he executed Epsom and Dudley and destroyed the council learned and he allowed nobles to access his private life more easily.

  2. Were the pretenders a serious threat to Henry VII's throne?

    at a major disadvantage, being the second to try and over throw the throne. Even though the points made beforehand show whether the pretenders were a serious threat to the throne or not, the general situation at the time also needs to be considered, whether Henry over-reacted, or if there was a true danger.

  1. Assessment of Henry VII's foreign policy.

    Luckily for Henry Vii, the French were keen to buy off the English late in 1492 because they wanted to invade Italy. Even more fortunate for Henry was the fact that the French conquest of Naples in 1494 set off a whole series of battles known as the Italian wars.

  2. "An exercise in Dynastic Consolidation" - How far is this an accurate description of ...

    Bretons defeated at Battle of St. Aubin du Cormier. So the Duke signed the Treaty of Sable, stating that his daughter could not marry without the French king's approval, when the Duke died the French king claimed custody of Anne, and the take over of Brittany by France seemed imminent.

  1. How successful was Henry VII in securing international recognition in the years 1485 to ...

    Henry also prevented Charles from helping Perkin Warbeck in his rebellion, and had secured an annual pension. Unfortunately, between the years 1502 and 1506 there were a series of deaths which undermined Henry?s foreign relations affecting his international recognition. Firstly, Henry?s son Arthur died in 1502, this affected Henry?s international

  2. How successful was Wolseys foreign policy in satisfying the ambitions of Henry VIII in ...

    This was a spectacular array of games held in Calais 1520 between Henry and Francis, it was meant to be a diplomatic meeting however no agreements were made, yet it did make Henry look good. However he failed on a lot of attempted invasions to France, but he overall succeeded in acquiring a degree of honour and glory in Europe.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work