• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

History Coursework 2003-Suez Crisis - What can you learn from Source A about Anthony Eden's reasons of opposing Colonel Nasser?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

History Coursework 2003-Suez Crisis What can you learn from Source A about Anthony Eden's reasons of opposing Colonel Nasser? Anthony Eden was Prime Minister at the time of the Suez Crisis in 1956. His political career began in 1923 and by 1926 he had become a parliamentary private secretary at the Foreign Office. He was very involved with the League of Nations, believing in their principles and at the age of 38, became Foreign Secretary. At this time international affairs were seen as being aggressive and Anthony Eden was forced to resign from Neville Chamberlain's Government over his policy of appeasement. He joined the Government during World War Two and became Secretary of State for war under Churchill. After the war times were very difficult with the Cold War at its peak and trouble in the Middle East. Colonel Nasser became dictator of Egypt in 1954 after leading a successful revolution against King Farouk. British troops left Egypt for the first time since 1882, and as soon as they had gone, Nasser declared the Suez Canal to be the property of the Egyptian Government. The Suez Canal was a vital shipping route for oil being brought to Britain. Eden wrongly saw Colonel Nasser as the next Hitler and was determined to make a stand against him. ...read more.

Middle

It does not say where this photo was from. I would say that this source is not too reliable. Source F is another extract from the Daily Mirror, this time, a letter from a reader. Again, this source is not entirely reliable as it is only one person's view. This may well represent a number of people who would have written along the same lines, but it is still not entirely clear just from the sources given that the majority of public opinion was against Eden's decision to take military action. Maybe a public opinion poll would have shown us this information better. Study Sources G and H. Does Source G support Selwyn Lloyd's statement (source H) about Britain's motives for military action against Egypt? Source G is an extract from a letter written by Anthony Eden to the President of the United States regarding Suez. In this he states his primary concern is to free the Suez Canal from Egypt's control. His secondary purpose is to remove Nasser from power and replace him with a regime more favourable to the western powers. Source H is from a book written by Selwyn Lloyd, the Foreign Secretary at the time of the Suez crisis. In his book, he sees the objectives as, firstly, to prevent a war breaking out in the Middle East. ...read more.

Conclusion

Nasser emerged from the affair with credit as he had defied the old imperial powers and so was very popular at home and among the Arab states. Israel had nothing to show for the fighting in terms of land but they had opened the Gulf of Aqaba to their shipping and had shown Egypt that they were a power to be reckoned with. The US had shown themselves to be firm in their handling of the Western allies and this went down well in the poor countries. Russia had come to the same conclusion, and only Britain and France had nothing to be pleased about. They had been made to look foolish and humiliated by international opinion. Rarely had a British government encountered such a storm of hostility. Whilst I agree that Britain was made to look foolish, to have done nothing and allowed Nasser to keep control of the Suez Canal without challenging him was not an option, as they would have then looked weak. As Britain had no troops in the region, we could not have allowed Nasser to have the canal under his control as he could have held us to ransom and would feel that he had won. At least even though we may have been humiliated, it did stop Nasser from thinking that he could do as he wished without being challenged. James Taylor 5N ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Europe and the Suez Crisis 1956 - To what extent was the military action ...

    Nasser a new Hitler.5 The French Minister Mollet, did not attempt to keep in good terms with any Arab, whom he felt distrust towards, and was to be a strong supporter of the decision to use military force. They believed that the money of the Algerian rebels, which they fought against, came from Cairo.

  2. To what extent can the Suez Canal crisis of 1956 been said to have ...

    In 1954, Britain agreed to withdraw, and in June, 1956, the British completed their evacuation of armed forces from Egypt and the canal zone. After Great Britain and the United States withdrew their pledges of financial support to help Egypt build the Aswan High Dam, Egyptian President Gamal Abdal Nasser nationalised (July, 1956)

  1. What can you learn from Source A about the reasons for US involvement in ...

    This shows that the Viet Cong were motivated and that they had clear set out targets, this helped them remain undefeated by the US. Part of the reason why the Viet Cong were so well motivated was because they truly believed in what they were fighting for; communism.

  2. Analyse and Discuss the Reasons Behind the Breakdown in the Relationship Between the United States a

    down the road with their plans for a separate West German state: whatever the Soviet intention it was once again based on misjudgement and a miscalculation, and succeeded only in pushing forward the establishment of a West German state. Realising eventually that the only choices open to him was to

  1. American History.

    All that was left was ratification... 11. The results of the Peace Treaty of 1783 *1782: The Treaty of Paris* - The Americans soon disregarded their instructions from their leaders to follow the French b/c they [correctly] realized that the French were not so much their allies as they were Britain's enemies, if you know what I mean.

  2. Hiroshima Coursework This piece of coursework will concentrate on three questions, all source based.

    Therefore, he could not fully express his ideas and feelings towards the whole situation, only parts that were for the USSR. 3) In source I Admiral William Leahy suggests that the use of nuclear weapons against Japan was wrong. To what extent do the sources support this interpretation?

  1. Rationality, Educated Opinion and Peace

    the League of Nations with those of the man on the street. The intellectuals, who tend to be idealists by his definition, strive to secure and maintain peace via means of treaties, covenants and legal codifications. The general public, however, is more concerned with the practice of international affairs (as opposed to the theory.)

  2. What can you learn form Source A about Anthony Eden's reasons for opposing Colonel ...

    Also he is above everybody so I am guessing he is on some people's shoulders. This maybe interpreted as an act of approval from the Egyptian people. Finally all the people around him are taking their hats off to him which is a sign of respect to Colonel Nasser.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work