• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How accurate is it to say that the growth of Black Power was the most important factor in the weakening of the civil rights movement in the 1960s?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Rhiannon Bayes 12.1 How accurate is it to say that the growth of Black Power was the most important factor in the weakening of the civil rights movement in the 1960s? Black Power is a political slogan and a name for various ideas aimed at promoting the Black racial group. There are and have previously been mixed views on whether Black Power was the most important factor in the weakening of the civil rights movement in the 1060s. Some people agree that Black Power weakened the civil rights movement because groups like the Nation of Islam used violence in campaigns. However, some people disagreed that Black Power weakened the civil rights movement on the basis that civil rights was limited for other reasons like the difference between the North and South. One argument in agreement that Black Power were highly important in weakening the civil rights movement is the point that Black Power were more than happy to use violence if it meant getting their point across. This was in contrast to other movements such as the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP), as other groups preferred to use peaceful protests. ...read more.

Middle

They trusted the American system and therefore would never be able to set black people free. He also made claims that MLK was being paid by the White government to preach Christian love and forgiveness and was preventing black people from effectively fighting for their rights. Malcolm X also made criticisms of the March of Washington, in which he said ?nothing by a circus with clowns and all? organised by a bunch of ?Uncle Toms? who were slavishly serving their Whiter masters. These negative comments made by Malcolm X had an important role in the weakening of the civil rights movement because they lost the support of many White people as well as Black people and this resulted in them not making much progress. They were very biased to Black people and this did not work in their favour, so they were important for the weaknesses. In opposition to this, people also believed that Black Power wasn?t the only group responsible for the weakening of the civil rights movement because they believed that other groups played a bigger role. One reason for this was that other groups like the NAACP, SNCC and CORE also criticised Martin Luther King. ...read more.

Conclusion

MLK was from the South and had a very privileged upbringing. This created division in his popularity, as people from the North couldn?t relate to him. This lost support and therefore weakened the civil rights movement. In the South people were still being lynched for simply being Black. Education was legally segregated, which meant black children often had to walk miles to a Black only school, which had limited facilities and was in an unsafe area. There were therefore different issues and it was segregation against discrimination. Northern groups felt that Southern groups could not understand their views because of this division. Neither of these reasons for divisions or weakening had anything to do with Black Power. In conclusion, Black Power was partially responsible for the weakening of the civil rights movement because they promoted violence and undermined the peaceful protests demonstrated by other leaders like MLK. They were also responsible because Malcolm X, their leader criticised MLK, which didn?t show unity and was a weakening factor. However, there were other factors that contributed to the weakening, for example the fact that other groups criticised MLK and that there were divisions between the North and South and therefore Black Power was not the most important reason for the weakening of the civil rights movement in the 1960s. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent were Malcolm X and the subsequent Black Power Movement the 'Evil ...

    4 star(s)

    psychological burden upon...victims" of the violent oppression at the hands of white Americans.21 A strong criticism of Malcolm X has been that he incited violence but this was not his aim. He was against the 'turn the other cheek' philosophy of King and, rather than using random acts of violence

  2. Compare the aims, methods and achievements of MLK and Malcolm X. Which man do ...

    that non-violent protest was the most effective manner with which black and civil rights activists could champion their cause. This is because non-violent protest did not provide white America with the ammunition to vilify Civil Rights activists (though many tried).

  1. Short term impact of Malcolm X

    Malcolm spoke in New York to teenagers from Mississippi, he was an inspiration to the students "One of the first things I think young people, especially nowadays, should learn is how to see for yourself and listen for yourself and think for yourself.

  2. Linguistic Study - Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream', and ...

    "...refuse to believe that the bank of justice is empty". This simplifies the situation so the audience can look at it from a different perspective. It is an interesting use of monetary analogy - the idea that black Americans have been sold short over a long period of time.

  1. How far was Martin Luther King's leadership responsible for the gains made by the ...

    The Supreme Court also showed considerable leadership on civil rights issues. Eisenhower?s decision in 1953 to appoint Earl Warren as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court was extremely important as he was more sympathetic to civil rights issues and used his authority to persuade other members of the Supreme Court that segregation in education could no longer be tolerated.

  2. How far were the forces opposed to civil rights responsible for the failure of ...

    Despite Daley openly condemning discrimination against black Americans in employment, ?he had done little about their appalling housing conditions?.[3] One of the reasons for his unwillingness to help was because ?he did not want to alienate his white working class voters?[4].

  1. Civil Rights Revision Cards 1945-68

    Who? NAACP 1. RP = member 2. Cost half million 3. Took case to court (federal district court said segregation was unconstitutional, Supreme Court backed this when challenged by Montgomery City commissioners) nb ? the boycott itself did not change the segregation laws ? NAACP?s court case did ? BROWDER v GAYLE ? made segregation of buses illegal.

  2. How far do you agree that the Black Power movement hindered the civil rights ...

    The militant philosophies of Malcolm X influenced civil right advocates such as Stokely Carmichael and Floyd McKissick, who took over the iconic organisations SNCC and CORE respectively and expelled white members from their ranks. Because of these changes, white people would inevitably be alienated and refuse to support civil rights.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work