• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How close did Britain come to revolution between 1815 and 1822?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How close did Britain come to revolution between 1815 and 1822? This essay will look at all the opposition groups of the time and assess how close they were to bringing revolution to Britain. The Luddites were at their peak between 1811 and 1816, they were mostly based in northern towns and cities. They were mostly ex-weavers who were angry at being out of work, they wanted their old jobs back, or some form of poor relief. They went round smashing the new machines that had taken their jobs. The Luddites were not very revolutionary at all, they were just angry that they had gone from being well-paid professionals to being unemployed in such a short space of time. ...read more.

Middle

This became known as the March of the Blanketeers, as the marchers carried blankets on their heads as they marched. However many of the blanketeers were stopped at Macclesfield, and those who made it past Macclesfield were stopped at Stockport. The blanketeers were not very revolutionary at all, they were peacefully marching for what they wanted, which certainly was not to overthrow the government. The Pentrich rising in Derbyshire in June of 1917 was when a group of stocking makers and quarry men marched from Pentrich to Nottingham castle, they were unhappy with conditions and wanted to overthrow the government. They tried to seize the castle, but Oliver, an agent provocateur working for the government, reported them and they were stopped. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Cato Street conspiracy of 1820 was, without doubt, the most revolutionary plan of the time. A group of spenceans and subversive revolutionaries wanted to overthrow the government by 'blowing-up' Lord Liverpool and his cabinet when they were at dinner, then parading their heads through the streets of London. However, a spy reported the conspirators and they were arrested and either executed or transported. The Cato Street conspirators were the most revolutionary group of the time, and if their plan had been carried through successfully then it is almost definite that there would have been revolution in Britain. In conclusion, Britain never really came close to revolution between 18165 and 1822. There were some revolutionary plans, but none came to fruition due to the government's effective and successful use of spies and agent provocateurs. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. How and why did Lord Liverpool survive the Radical Challenges of 1812 ...

    This meant that any political prisoner could be held without trial, this was seen as a massive breach of personal liberties. However it only lasted 10 months and only 44 people were arrested and 37 detained therefore it was a deterrent against further radical threats.

  2. The luddites.

    Once they accomplished what they sought to do they would disappear back into the woods before the authorities could even give chase. Members of these Luddite groups did not identify themselves to each other with names but used numbers instead.

  1. History Of Framlingham Castle

    The Howard's also added brickwork around the castle. They did this to maintain safety, as they would have had children around so the made sure the crenellation was high enough so they didn't fall down and also covered the well so the children didn't fall in that. They also added brickwork to maintain the classic shape of the crenellation.

  2. Industrial Revolution

    Only in terms of economics can this historical period really be seen as fundamentally altering the composition and character of the country, with industrialisation creating the world's first truly capitalist society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work