• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did Wolsey managed to stay in power for so long?

Extracts from this document...


How did Wolsey managed to stay in power for so long Wolsey managed to stay in power so long for several reasons, all of which stem from one thing, his ability to keep Henry VIII content and happy. He came to power by pleasing Henry's foreign policy aims, coordinating an attack on France. He fell from power when he was finally unable to please Henry's aims, and get him his divorce. Through out his time as Henry's "right hand man" he was able to make possible and practical Henry's desires. Where Wolsey was most successful was in foreign policy. At the time England was a comparatively small player in the "big game" of Europe, but Wolsey was able to make up for the shortcomings of England through planning, foresight, diplomacy and hard work. ...read more.


However England at the time didn't have the men or the resources to become a great military power in Europe, which Wolsey realised, so in order for England to be great she had to be taken down a different root. In 1518, the Treaty of London was this new root; it allowed England and therefore Henry to appear as the arbitrator of Europe. The Treaty of London was a "Universal Peace" that all the big powers and many of the small signed. It was Wolsey who came up with the idea (although the original had been the popes) and Wolsey who brought it to fruition, the "glory" that this put on Henry was immense, which pleased him greatly. ...read more.


These all show how accomplished Wolsey was at planning and organisation but most importantly how good he was at keeping Henry happy, even if there motives clashed, Wolsey was a humanist, but he organised many attacks on foreign powers to keep his masters happy. Another important role of Wolsey's was law and order, as Lord Chancellor he was the highest legal person in the country. One of Henry's major domestic concerns was keeping the Nobles in check, as his father had usurped the throne the Tudor dynasty was relatively new, and the state had no standing army where as the noble all had there own, this all meant that the nobles were potentially dangerous to Henry. Wolsey was able to use his legal power to curtail the Nobility, he did this through several methods, his first was the idea of "impartial justice" implemented under Wolsey ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

The author shows some understanding of Wolsey's role in foreign negotiations and in ensuring loyalty to the King but the examination is very brief and other points could have been considered, particularly the argument that Henry disliked the day-to-day work associated with being King so looked to Wolsey to relieve the burden.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 16/07/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Free essay

    To what extent did Henry VII reduce the power of the nobility

    4 star(s)

    rewarded for the contribution towards the government such as the Earl of Oxford and John de Vere. As a result this factor of power change goes against the thought that the nobles had a reduction of power, however this is only a small section of the change in power for

  2. How and why did Lord Liverpool survive the Radical Challenges of 1812 ...

    Training Prevention Act which banned all unauthorized paramilitary drilling and training were largely ineffective and deemed useless. The Blasphemous and Seditious Libels Act allowed local magistrates to conduct searches for and to seize blasphemous and seditious publications; this was to prevent the rise of more revolutionary press however this piece of legislation was not rigorously enforced so wasn't effective.

  1. With what success did Wolsey pursue his aims in foreign policy?

    The ascension of Charles ruined the first part of this: he was a young, ambitious ruler and decided instead to make peace with Francis at Noyon. Maximillian also decided to make peace with France. Obviously, Wolsey's anti-French policy was therefore ruined, and he was forced to seek peace with France, leading to the Treaty of London.

  2. What kind of king does Shakespeare create in Act 3 Scenes 1 and 2? ...

    There is an overall high moral and philosophical content in the scene; there are also numerous definitions of what nationalism and patriotism are. The language Shakespeare uses in Henry's speech that adds to the overall effect of the scene, he uses figurative when referring to the men like greyhounds in the slips.

  1. Were the pretenders a serious threat to Henry VII's throne?

    This was even more dangerous because of their motives, de la Pole was Richard III's named heir, and hoped that when Henry was overthrown, he would have a chance at becoming king himself. Lovell was one of Richard's most trusted advisors, and obviously wanted to avenge his death.

  2. Asses the most important factors that led to David Lloyd George(TM)s downfall in 1922

    sufficient to pay her debts to the US, but the US did not cancel their debt. The Genoa Conference was a disaster for Lloyd George. After WW1 there was great optimism in Britain, which presented a problem for LG and the Coalition, because hopes were so high that it was almost inevitable the public would end up disappointed.

  1. Why, despite their fearsome reputation, did the Spanish Armada fail in their attack on ...

    Phillip was very disappointed when, early in Elizabeth's reign, the Protestant faith was formalised and the Church of England was set-up. Phillip was a strong Roman Catholic, and the Spanish inquisition treated Protestants and other religious groups such as Jews very harshly.

  2. Analyse the causes of the 1848 revolution in France.

    However, Louis-Phillipe thought differently, ignoring his past (as a young man he was a refugee abroad which led him to view active/aggressive foreign policy with suspicion) and his natural caution and desire for peace, one has to take into account the fact that the other major European Powers were determined

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work