• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How does Shakespeare present the Character of King Henry V in act 2, scene 2.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How does Shakespeare present the Character of King Henry V in act 2, scene 2. In act 2, scene 2 Shakespeare presents Henry as someone who is powerful, confidant and dominant. However he is also presented as being human like everyone else and having normal emotions. Shakespeare has created Henry's personality to show what makes an ideal king. Shakespeare shows Henry's power by his anger and superiority over the traitors. When talking to the traitors he makes a long speech through which Shakespeare stresses Henry's power, 'How dare you for shame, talk of mercy.' The phrase, 'How dare you' suggests that Henry is outraged. It also suggests that he is disgusted by the way his inferiors are talking to him. This shows power as he is showing his outrage and telling them what to do. The power of his speech could be shown on stage by Henry's facial expressions such as glaring, going red in the face or narrowing his eyes. His anger could also be shown by violent actions such as knocking chairs over and grabbing hold of the traitors. ...read more.

Middle

This is seen in his anger towards the traitors, 'Thou cruel, ungrateful, savage and inhuman creature. The words, 'savage' and 'cruel' show Henry's anger and how he is feeling immensely angered by the traitors' betrayal. Once again through Henry's passionate behaviour Shakespeare creates an image of Henry as an ordinary man with emotions which are common to everyone else. By using emotions that are felt by everyone such as anger, he makes Henry seem like a normal person not some kind of God who is perfect. Henry is also presented as being a fair, kind and honourable king. His fairness and kindness are seen by the way he treats characters in the script unaccording to their status. These qualities are seen by the way he deals with someone who has committed an offence, 'And on his more advice we pardon him'. The word, 'pardon' suggests that the king has forgiven the criminal. It also suggests that he is a kind person as he is allowing the criminal to go free. Shakespeare presents Henry as being a fair person by the way he gives the traitors a chance to own up to what they have done, 'We carry not ...read more.

Conclusion

The phrase, 'by interception they dream not of' suggests that the king is cunning as he has found out that they are traitors without them knowing. I think that Shakespeare presents king Henry as a character who is powerful, respected, fair, cunning and basically human. These are the qualities that I believe Shakespeare thought a good king should possess. Power is an important quality for Henry as it gives him control and respect. I think the audience of this script would want the king to be powerful as it gives a feeling of security and well being. Shakespeare presents Henry as being fair, to show that a good king should treat everyone justly and in a humane way. Henry is presented as cunning in order to show that a king should have intelligence and also be able to overcome and workout problems such as treachery. The most important quality that I think Shakespeare gives Henry's character is that of being human. It brings Henry down from the clouds and the image of him being a God who cannot do anything wrong down to earth so that normal people can understand him and relate to him more freely. It shows that although he's a king, he still shares all the pains and emotions of a normal person. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. How does Shakespeare present the character of Henry V

    These qualities are bound to make him a popular king. In his speech Henry mentions many aspects of life, including peace, war, honour and patriotism. "Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry "God for Harry, England and Saint George!" An understanding of these is a good basis for kingship.

  2. What kind of king does Shakespeare create in Act 3 Scenes 1 and 2? ...

    pleasure - seeking teenage prince who wrestles with his role as heir to the throne: "...as for proof now, a purse of Gold most resolutely snatched on Monday night, and most dissolutely spent on Tuesday morning; got with swearing 'lay by!', and spent with crying 'bring in!'", here Shakespeare illustrates Hal as a thieving, rebellious and undesirable youth.

  1. If only they could talk

    CHAPTER THIRTEEN: James Herriot meets Mrs. Pumphrey, she was an elderly widow. She was the owner of the most beautiful house in Darrowby (a city in Yorkshire Dales) she also had a Pekingese with weight problems. Mrs. Pumphrey gives the best treatment to Mr.

  2. Henry V Character Analysis

    "For never two such kingdoms did contend/ Without much fall of blood". This idea of him understanding and contemplating upon the effects of war and not wanting it to be pointless underlines his quality of pragmatism. Moreover, Henry's realistic sense of judgement is also conveyed by his consciousness of England's

  1. Henry II (1154 - 1189) is generally seen as the main catalyst in the ...

    The Avalon Project at Yale Law School: Assize of Clarendon, 1166', (Stubbs' "Charters'" p 143), Pages 1-4, http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/medieval/assizecl.htm [Visited 31/10/2002] 32. The Constitutions of Clarendon 1164, pages 1-5 http://www.britainexpress.com/History/medieval/clarendon.htm (Visited 16/12/2002) 33. The National Archives Learning Curve Education on the Internet & Teaching History Online Henry II, http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/MEDhenryII.htm [Visited 11/12/2002] 34.

  2. Changes in Crime and Punishment.

    (ii) After 1815 governments showed an increase willingness to accept some of the arguments of the reformers. In 1823 the Gaols Act was passed. The Act stated that the payment of salaries to the prison officers, regular inspection of prisons and visits from chaplains and surgeons and the grading of prisoner for work.

  1. Crime Scene InvestigationJames Bulger Assignment

    Questions would have been asked by the FAO. Police Officers would have done searches for the lost child. Police also searched the Walton Canal as they had testimonial evidence that the three boys had been seen there. A FAO wouldn't be needed at this scene as it was only a search for the boy.

  2. King Henry V: Noble Hero or Devious Brute?

    to 'play a set' and strike 'his fathers crown into the hazard, basically declaring war. On Henry's part, this is a spontaneous action and could show that Henry has a short temper, which is not a good quality for a king to have.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work