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How effective was Henry VII’s government?

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Introduction

How effective was Henry VII's government? To judge how effective Henry's government was, many factors have to be considered. A government at the time consisted of different sections that could all be effective in one way or another. Due to the situation before and during the reign, this has to be taken into account when summing up Henry's government. The situation when Henry took the crown was very different to that when he died, leaving his successor, Henry VIII with a chance to continue the dynasty. The length of Henry's reign (24 years) and the fact that the dynasty he founded would occupy the throne for the whole of the sixteenth century are testimony to his adept handling of the day-to-day business of government. This way it already shows that Henry's government must have been effective to some extent. The situation in England after the Wars of the Roses was crisis. After the years of rule under Richard III, Henry had a big task in securing the throne due to his weak claim. Many of the powerful nobles in the kingdom had been killed during these wars, leaving Henry short of support from the established nobility. Henry faced some other immediate problems that he had to raise enough money to defend himself while imposing his influence on the situation in the kingdom. ...read more.

Middle

Government was centred upon the king and the members of the king's council. In Henry's council, councillors were chosen on merit and expected to provide a real service. It was clear however; that the king was very much in control of his council and the other institutions which he governed realm. Some of Henry's councillors had served on the councils of Edward IV and Richard III. What this provided Henry was an excellent level of estate management, which was invaluable to a king anxious to get the greatest profits. By surrounding himself with influential and intelligent nobles, Henry's government had a very effective centre that the other sections could be managed from. The council also fulfilled a judicial function, maintaining law and order. This way the council could issue an executive order and summon people before it, as it had great power with the support of the nobility. Henry may have initially hoped that his council would take the lead in imposing order upon a turbulent society, but this swamped the council with civil actions. Therefore it could be said that while the king's central government had a very effective system, the needs of Henry may have reduced it effectiveness and made it less of a success. Since Henry governed England through his council and household, parliament played little role in the policy making. Parliament sessions totalled a mere 21 months in a reign of over 23 years. ...read more.

Conclusion

Evidence would suggest that his financial policy was a great success. This was a result of careful management and the great skill and spending limits of Henry himself. Having a government centred on the council was less effective as the king had hoped that it could perform the roles of more than one section. As a result it lowered the governments effectiveness as it had more administrative work than the councillors could manage. Despite this it could be still said that the government was successful for Henry's main aim. Where the government was not successful was with the Cornish Tax Rebellion, where the failure of the government could have put Henry himself in danger. The actual threat posed by this was not so great but reminded the king that the government couldn't achieve all that he wanted. Taking all the evidence into consideration, I would be fair to say that in achieving the aim of continuing the Tudor dynasty, Henry's government was very effective, as the king had a long reign and left a son, Henry VIII. In running England, the majority of the government could be seen as effective. Finances were in good order and law and order was run sensibly. By copying many of the successful policies of Edward IV, it allowed Henry to have a successful base with which to build his own centralised and effective government on. ?? ?? ?? ?? David Bond 6KY How effective was Henry VII's government? ...read more.

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