• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far did Henry VIII persue new foreign policies during the period 1509-1514?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far did Henry VIII persue new foreign policies during the period 1509-1514? When accessing how far Henry VIII pursued new foreign policies in the period 1509-1514, it is important to take into account the idea of change and continuity. Henry VII established some very strong and clear foreign policies, however Henry VIII wanted to very much distance himself from his father's work and ethos. It is essential to look at the policies that Henry VIII changed and the reasons behind this, but also whether he kept any of his father's strategies. It is vital to remember that many factors contributed to the characters of both Henry VII and Henry VIII. I will continuously focus on the theme of their childhood and upbringing, and how these factors may have contributed to their behaviour in adulthood, and how well they were prepared for the role of a king. Henry VII was perceived as a miserly character, whose enigmatic and distant nature caused him to be disliked by many. He was, however, very independent and was "governed by none," which ensured that everything was overlooked by him. Similarities between Henry VIII and his father were that they were both good at networking and highly intelligent. ...read more.

Middle

Henry VIII was brought up with the idea that past family members, in particular Henry V, were extremely victorious in wars. This affected Henry so much, that not only did he want a parallel glory to Henry V, but he also commissioned a translation of a book about Henry V's early life. Henry VIII was also made aware of the fact that it was only 80 years since Henry VI had been crowned king of France, which meant that according to him, he rightfully inherited the French crown. Unlike his father's peace policy, Henry believed in a more traditional interventionist policy. Henry wanted prestige and military glory, which he gained when winning the battle of the spurs. This was very successful through Henry's eyes, as it was the first territorial gain in France for 75 years, and did much to heighten his popularity. Henry persued this idea of being militarily successful, but I do not believe he achieved this. Henry was in France whilst James IV was victorious at Flodden, which made Henry's gains become overshadowed by James IV victory in England. Even though this was a victory for England, it is questionable as to whether it was a victory for Henry. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is thought that Henry VII was hanging by a thread, and by the end of his rule was not at all secure. Henry VIII wanted to distance himself from this, and expectations were upon him to act differently to his father. He persued foreign polices that were dissimilar to Henry VII's, and, apart from the idea of continuing and securing the Tudor dynasty through arranged marriages, every other policy was a contrast. I believe that this is due not only to society expectations at the time, but also Henry VIII had clear expectations for himself from an early age. Growing up in the shadow of his older brother's legacy may have been difficult for Henry, and so when he was given the power, he used it to the maximum, always with full determination, sometimes with naivety. As a child, he was constantly thinking of the past generations, and their glory and patriotism, and how they were respected and adored, usually due to their military connections. It is no surprise that Henry VIII persued the foreign policies that he did. Regardless of whether they were successful or not, he did everything in his power to follow his own path, and neglect his father's legacy. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    How successful was English foreign policy in the years 1509 1529?

    4 star(s)

    by ambassadors from England, reacting in support of the French, when Charles refused to accept the latest peace terms. This was definitely a failure, as the economic effect of the resultant trade embargo with the Netherlands was near catastrophic. England's primary exports at the time were wool, and cloth.

  2. How far were James I's problems inherited, how far of his own making?

    Whilst we have looked at James's relationship with Parliament and his financial ineptitude as problems we have not examined the area for which he is famous: the over-reliance on favourites. Jenny Wormald argued that James was a "visibly weak" monarch due to his blatant over reliance on intermediaries and favourites.

  1. How far did Henry VIII achieve his aims 1509 - 1514?

    However, there were many failures which compromised whether, overall, his aim was successful. One main failure was that Henry had tried to invade France a year before, in 1512, but his army had embarrassingly failed due to the distractions of drink and women, and then contracted dysentery.

  2. How Far Did Henry VIII's Government in 1509 to 1514 differ from that of ...

    bullying them and policing them to do the right thing, Henry VIII had a less tough stance on them, and especially during the beginning of his reign as he understood how important they were to him, so he made sure they were treated right and in return he could rely on their support.

  1. How successful a King was Henry VIII during the period of 1509-1514?

    One of his main achievements in securing relationships with Europe was his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. Spain was under the rule of Ferdinand and Isabella and was a strong Catholic power. Ferdinand had been disputing with France for many years over land in Southern Italy and the Pyrenees.

  2. Henry VIII foreign policy

    The holy league and treaty of London are examples of were nations have got together to maintain a balance of power. Although Charles did stop the treaty and upsetting the balance more by becoming a super power in Europe. The league of cognac in 1526 was though set up by

  1. "An exercise in Dynastic Consolidation" - How far is this an accurate description of ...

    Lambert Simnel received support from Ireland and Burgundy. The Irish were always prepared to support alternative claimants to the throne as they opposed to an English King. However the support from Burgundy was unusual. Throughout the Hundred Years War against France, Burgundy had been England's main ally, and it was the main outlet for English cloth.

  2. How successful was Henry VII in securing international recognition in the years 1485 to ...

    Secondly, Henry ensured that he included dynastic recognition in all the important treaties that he signed for example, The Treaty of Estaples. Henry had announced his intentions of asserting his claim to the French crown and sent commissioners to collect a forced loan when the loss of Brittany was clear in the summer of 1491.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work