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How far do these sources agree that Wolsey's foreign policy was defensive?

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Introduction

How far do these sources suggest that Wolsey's foreign policy was defensive? Wolsey was a very cautious man, he satisfied Henry's requests as well as using his requirements to earn and achieve his own positions. Wolsey was only fifteen when he entered Oxford University, one of the best universities in the whole of England. This demonstrates his firm personality, he wasn't born into a noble family and is believed that his father was a cattle dealer; this meant he had to sacrifice himself to achieve his positions. He ended up as one of the most powerful men in the whole of England; some say he was more powerful than Henry himself. Being a religious believer may have influenced Wolsey on to make peace instead of provoking war, these sources are mostly written in a colloquial language and all commonly agree that it was a waste of money to invest in the French territory. ...read more.

Middle

His certainty was increased by events such as those at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520.'' assuming that he was seen as a brave king thereafter this event. However, source G disagrees with Source F as it states that Wolsey wanted to make peace between countries suggesting that his policy was defensive as he didn't intend to provoke war. ''...Wolsey established England as the peacemaker ...'' this statement describes how Wolsey intended ally England to main powerful countries such as France, yet he is described as a cautious man that tries to satisfy Henry's ambition for representitiveness; ''...he was careful not to ignore Henry's desire for military glory...'' therefore suggesting that Wolsey was cautious not to agreviate Henry's need for military power and established peace throughout Europe. This source was also written in the twentieth century by Angela Anderson and Tony Imperato, the fact that it was written by two historians implies that it is reliable yet debatable as it is also a secondary source. ...read more.

Conclusion

Source H is weighted towards the idea that Wolsey's foreign policy is defensive as it shows that he is discouraging the invasion of France. Source G and H support the idea that Wolsey's foreing policy was defensive and have described that Wolsey would often discourage invasions. Yet source F describes that Wolsey's policy was not defensive as the Field of the Cloth of Gold was a main that showed otherwise furthermore, Wolsey did plan the invasion where Tournai and Theruanne were seized. However, all the sources state that the invasion of France was considered a loss of money. Moreover, it is agreed that Wolsey's Foreign policy was defensive as it was in his high interest to establish stable relationships with the rest of Europe. I strongly believe that Wolsey's foreign policy was defensive as in numerous occasions and events such as the treaty of London in 1518 which Wolsey proposed and organised; it was signed and agreed by major nations that they would not invade one another and would aid if any were under threat. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This is a really good attempt to stick closely to the sources and does not drift off into narrative. In some places the sources are used together and this essay would be even better if there was more cross referencing and comparison of the views presented in the sources. It would also get a higher level if the evaluation of the sources was more detailed and considered how the provenance of the sources effects its value.

Marked by teacher Kate Forbes 29/08/2012

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