• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far do you agree that the impact of WW2 was the main reason why the position of African-Americans improved in the years 1945-1955?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐How far do you agree that the impact of WW2 was the main reason why the position of African-Americans improved in the years 1945-1955? During the war, many black people moved from the South to the North to worked in factories for armament. These wages paid much more than working in the South, also their wages were still less than white people in identical jobs. Nevertheless Black people now had an economic power they had not had before. The effects of the war also made some white soldiers change their minds about black people and racism in general. After witnessing the horrors of the holocaust, they saw a side of racism they couldn?t ignore. It also brought to attention the hypocrisy of America, who were fighting the Nazi?s and their racism towards Jews, meanwhile black people at home had no rights. Black soldiers in Germany were treated better than they were in the U.S. Relationships between black American soldiers and German women, while frowned upon, were not legally forbidden, whereas any public interaction between black men and white women in the U.S. ...read more.

Middle

They delivered their report, named ?To Secure These Rights? in 1947 and were disbanded. The report explored gaps in wages, cases of lynching, positions in the military, job discrimination, differences in life expectancy and quality of healthcare and highlighted a desperate need for social reform. New laws were proposed to stop lynching. Truman aimed to make Roosevelt?s Fair Employment Practises Commission a permanent fixture but this move was stopped by Southern senators who filibustered the bill. However, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Washington successfully enacted and enforced their own FEPC laws at the state level. Although most legal cases and laws were passed in the later years of the fight for civil rights, there were some court cases which had a significant impact. The case of Sweatt vs. Painter (1950) involved a black man, Heman Sweatt, who wasn?t allowed into the School of Law of the University of Texas, even though he had fit the course requirements. The University?s President was called Theophilus Painter. At the time, no law school in Texas would admit black students. ...read more.

Conclusion

The decision overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision of 1896. Although I believe that presidential action had a significant effect on the Civil Rights movement, as To Secure These Rights made segregation a public issue that could not be ignored, Truman could only do so much, mostly due to the fact he could be blocked by State law and by senators who disagreed with him such as the Dixiecrats. Nevertheless, the FEPC would only apply to government owned businesses, and so actually would not have impacted the majority of African-Americans. Truman?s second term in office ended in 1953, and he was replaced by Dwight Eisenhower, who did not share Truman?s passion for Civil Rights. He refused to comment on the case of Brown v. Board of Education, making it clear to the general public that he still supported segregation. Brown was a very significant case that was a landmark in the civil rights movement, however the change was not de facto, and it took years for most schools to fully integrate. Therefore, I believe that the impact of the Second World War was the most important factor, as it changed many people?s beliefs and made the government realise they needed to do something about segregation and racism in their country. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    pushed the issue of civil rights out of the minds of many, and the sudden rush of legislation ended twice as quickly as it had begun. A Fair Housing Act was passed in 1968 by Congress, and this did, in many ways, help end even de facto segregation, by allowing

  2. To what extent was WW2 the most significant turning point for civil rights

    Many black soldiers returning from the war decided not to return south but instead go north and start afresh and take advantage of the new job prospects. The war on the whole led to a big growth in the "black consciousness" and changed the role of African Americans in US

  1. How far do you agree that the years 1945-55 saw only limited progress in ...

    This meant that the rest of the country was unable to acknowledge the dilemma of segregation on interstate buses in the South. Furthermore, the interstate bus companies remained segregated long after the campaign. This meant that there was still little de jure change and CORE?s ambition of interstate bus desegregation failed to materialize.

  2. How far was Martin Luther King's leadership responsible for the gains made by the ...

    De Facto change was finally secured. To conclude, The presidents as a whole played a vital role towards the gains made by the civil rights movement however it is clear that without the efforts made by the civil rights organisations to gain media attention and therefore increase the public support

  1. I disagree that the decision made by the Supreme Court in the Brown v. ...

    The blacks had believed that improving education of the blacks was a vital step needed to improve conditions more generally. Without a good education, getting a good job was nearly impossible.

  2. 'Johnson alone bears the responsibility for the escalation of war in Vietnam in the ...

    So first some people and money was sent over to Vietnam, then some economic advisors, then military advisors, then this can only be escalated because there was only one option left ? sending in soldiers. So LBJ didn?t have a choice.

  1. How Far Do You Agree That The Impact Of World War 2 Was The ...

    Despite the initiatives implemented by President Truman it could be argued that these did more harm than good, as they forced integration within the army. There was also huge lack of commitment to these initiatives after they were put in place such as, black soldiers having different canteens and being transported to the battlefield in different vehicles.

  2. To What Extent Were The Activities Of the White Racist Groups, the Most Important ...

    Overall, the KKK were successful in spreading a negative stereotype of African Americans and made a significant contribution to the discrimination of African Americans, but their decline in numbers after the 1970s was paralleled with a decline in influence over the American people.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work