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How far do you agree that the Irish Rebellion was the most serious problems that faced Elizabeth after 1588?

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Introduction

History 1 How far do you agree that the Irish Rebellion was the most serious problems that faced Elizabeth after 1588? It is true that the Irish rebellion was one of the most serious problems that Elizabeth had faced however there were other problems after 1588 that could also be considered to be a serious problem that Elizabeth had to face. Events such as The spread of The Black Death disease, the rise in inflation and the debt of Elizabeth I, the shortage of food due to bad harvests, and many more. One reason why the Irish rebellion could be considered to be a serious problem that Elizabeth needed to face is because Ireland is a crucial area that could be used by other foreign invaders as a springboard to take over the England. Another reason why the Ireland's rebellion to the queen was a serious problem is because Ireland might have to ask help from Spain since both of these countries believe in the same kind of religion. ...read more.

Middle

We can again argue that the Ireland's Rebellion was a serious problem for Elizabeth outside the country. Which then brings us to another big problem that Elizabeth had to face after 1588, economically speaking due to the scarcity of resources, prices had to be increased since demand exceeds the amount that is being supplied. When the Price rise, the poor or the low income earners won't be able to pay for food which then leads to cutting down on the number of people in labour. Thus creating a massive number of people that are unemployed as well as increasing the number of vagrancy in England. This was a serious problem for Elizabeth because there were loads of mouths to feed but also more hands work and be pay. However, David Palliser argues that by European standards Englishmen had a greater margin of substance compared to other European s at this time. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, this was dealt with Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy by motivating the English Forces to push Tyrone back towards Ulsher. In Conclusion the Irish rebellion was not the only serious problem that Elizabeth I had to face after 1588. Other factors such as the fluctuations in population and vagrancy, the rise in inflation leading to a the rise in debt, the war with Spain, the spread of the Black Death, the scarcity of food due to bad harvests, etc. are also major problems that Elizabeth had to face after 1588. However, it could be argued that the Irish is a big problem because it could be used as a spring board by other foreign invading countries to take over England. In addition, it was difficult to control the Irish because of the differences between the religious beliefs of England and Ireland. In support to this, if Ireland were to have problems with England then Ireland could just ask help from Spain because they are also Christian believers like the Irish. ...read more.

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