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How far do you agree that the peculiar method of Ottoman succession was ultimately detrimental to Ottoman power?

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Introduction

´╗┐Ngiam Hui Xin (11) 4H How far do you agree that the peculiar method of Ottoman succession was ultimately detrimental to Ottoman power? Yes I agree that the peculiar method of Ottoman succession was ultimately detrimental to Ottoman power. I would define the ?peculiar method? of succession as the way the sons had to fight over their father?s position of Sultan after he died, rather than the eldest son being the sultan, like the other empires at that time. This method was pretty effective at the start because it was the survival of the fittest, and therefore it was most likely that the surviving prince was the most suitable for the post of the sultan. I would also define ?ultimately detrimental? as the underlying factor that caused all the other problems to arise out of the Ottoman Empire, such that it led to its eventual decline in power. ...read more.

Middle

Although the revolts did clear up by the time the new Sultan had come to place and settled the country, this ultimately led to the decline of the Empire as the social state of the country was unstable. Since the people themselves had the power to make a change to the country, this peculiar method of succession caused the decline of the Ottoman Empire because it, in turn caused instability amongst the people, which proves that it was the underlying factor. However, this is not entirely true as since the Sultan had absolute power and was able to control the people, the people had to maintain the peace within the society or face his punishments, which were usually harsh, in order to discourage people from disobeying again in the future. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, this was ultimately untrue as because of the rivalry between the sons of the Sultan, killing eventually became replaced with keeping all the sons in the Harem in order to prevent them from harming one another. Only when the Sultan passed away were the sons allowed to leave, and usually the eldest son would become the next Sultan. Staying in the Harem meant that the sons were not allowed to gather any support from the people as they were not allowed provincial governorships anymore. And since staying in the Harem for such a long time was detrimental to their mental wellbeing as future leaders, the eldest son was no longer the fittest to be the Sultan, let alone the other sons. This robbed them of their chance to become Sultan, unlike the earlier, more ?meritocratic? system. Therefore, the peculiar method of succession was detrimental to Ottoman power as it ultimately backfired. ...read more.

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