• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far was Britain's declaration of war in 1914 a consequence of her ententes with Russia and France?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

COURSEWORK ASSIGNMENT PART B (c 1500 words) How far was Britain's declaration of war in 1914 a consequence of her ententes with Russia and France? Whether Britain's involvement in the World War I was complete consequence of her ententes with Russia and France is debateable as there were various other factors influencing the war. Diverse historians believe that it was due to the ententes that Britain declared war. In 1904, the Entente Cordial was signed between Britain and France, and shortly in 1907, the Triple Entente signed Russia, France, and Britain together uniting them in case of war. Many historians have suggested that Britain entered into the ententes due to the rising apparent 'power' of Germany. It seems to reveal that the British seemed to have forced themselves into an entente with France due to the economic and industrial pressure, which Germany had indirectly placed on her. This emphasises the fact that Britain seemed to take the Germanic threat seriously enough to push her into the ententes with France and Russia, so why then would she not fully back up her allies against her rivals, ultimately suggesting that the British where wholly prepared to attack her antagonists by signing the ententes in 1904 and 1907. ...read more.

Middle

Thus showing the vulnerability of the entente and that Britain considered herself to be aloof from Russia and France. When it seemed that the Germanic power was threatening the British dominance, the fear and insecurity seemed to be highlighted in the British people, press, and media. P. Hayes (Modern British Foreign Policy-The twentieth century 1890-1939) states 'Britain became involved because it was the consensus of opinion that her interests and the balance of power were threatened by Germany'. The introduction of the British naval rule were set to safeguard the British from any threats as a world power, but as a clear defiance to this the Germans launched the Weltpolitik in 1897, threatening Britain. It is implied that Britain joined the ententes due to her self- interests; to defend her colonies against her rival- Germany, as the alliance system between France, Russia, and Britain surrounded Germany shifting the balance of power, blurring temporarily the prospects of war. The increasing fear of Germany is illustrated in a memo by the German Ambassador in December 1904, 'up till now England has maintained no fleet in home waters equal to the German one'. Again the British fear, and anxiety is depicted by Robert Wolfson and John Laver who state that '...Britain were considerably alarmed by Germany's expansion in the late nineteenth century'... ...read more.

Conclusion

were too terrible to contemplate'. The conclusions in which various historians have concluded vary at different lengths. Particular historians will claim that France and Russia was the main reason for why Britain declared war in 1914 but certain historians will state that various other factors influenced Britain's decision for war. However, selected historians believe that other factors are equally important as the ententes in Britain's declaration of war. One can only speculate that if the ententes were not signed would there have been war in 1914 or go on further to convey that would Britain be in the war. With or without ententes the situation in Europe was reaching a breaking point, a point in which a war would perhaps have shattered the 'peace'. As numerous historians have, the balance of evidence for both aspects of an argument can be tilted. Due to this when viewing historic sources one must be sceptical of the true message of the source, as it may be concealed. To conclude, various historians believe that the declaration of war is not solely a result of her ententes as other factors influenced it. By looking at the situation in Europe whether the ententes were signed or not there would have been an outbreak of war. Therefore, war was not a complete consequence of the alliance systems. TEMITOPE FATUROTI TEMITOPE FATUROTI ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Why did tension increase in Europe between 1900 and 1914?

    Problems of the League * Russia was not allowed to join after the Communist Revolution in 1917. * The USA did not join, even though the League was Woodrow Wilson's idea. Congress voted against membership. In fact the USA would probably have made little difference.

  2. How far was Germany responsible for the outbreak of war in 1914?

    Russia responded by partially mobilizing against Austria. Germany warned Russia that continued mobilization would entail war with Germany, and it made Austria agree to discuss with Russia possible modification of the ultimatum to Serbia. Germany insisted, however, that Russia immediately demobilize.

  1. How And Why Did Britain Survive The War From 1940-1943?

    and the dilution of German troops across such a large area left the country without much of an army in the West. Should Germany be defeated in the east, which it was by the Soviet Union, then it would be the turning point of the Second World War in which Germany would find itself close to defeat.

  2. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    Fourteen guerrillas were killed. The incident occurred while armed men attempted to force the way through an army checkpoint on their way back to Tripoli after they had tacked a beach resort near Tripoli, owned by a man from the Frangieh family The next day several Christian-owned shops and houses in Tripoli belonging individuals from Zgharta were bombed and looted.

  1. How Stable Was the Tsarist Autocracy in 1914?

    Pitiful wages, 60- hour working week, the rate of industrial accidents horrific, overcrowded housing etc. and a general crude attitude towards the workers means that the Liberal point of view seems like capitalism was simply not being implemented properly and that serious reforms would need to be considered if that

  2. How did the War change life in Britain?

    are trying to explain the position they were in as a "conscientious objector". I don't know anyone would say "yes" but if they say "No" then they are at once open to the reply "Then are you willing to let other men fight and die for you, while you stay quietly and safe from harm at home?"

  1. Why And How Did Britain Survive The War From 1940-1943

    That was the way it was because Britain was in desperate trouble with its army in disarray and its commercial shipping and navy taking heavy losses from the German U-boats. Although Britain was preparing for a massive German invasion Hitler did not think there was a reason to attack Britain

  2. In 1915 a British Newspaper printed a letter from a 'Lady Reader' who claimed, ...

    The Women's Rights movement, including the Suffragettes, gave their full support to the war effort and women gave white feathers to every able-bodied man who didn't volunteer to sign on. One mother, Mrs Berridge, wrote into The Morning Post on 30 September 1914, "Those gallant boys of whom we, their

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work