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How far was the defeat of Germany in 1945 the most important turning point on International relations in the period 1879 1980?

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Introduction

How far was the defeat of Germany in 1945 the most important turning point on International relations in the period 1879 ? 1980? There was continuous unrest regarding International relations during the period 1879-1980. The defeat of Germany in 1945 by far was the most important turning point. The defeat let to the rise of the superpowers and the development of communism and capitalism, also the division of Europe and also produced a global power vacuum. Other factors that can be considered as a turning point on International relations is the Origins of the first world war which was the consequence of the alliance system. The Treaty of Versailles also played it part as it led to the first world war, furthermore the development of the Cold War and the Munich agreement had an impact on International relations during the given period. The defeat of Germany in 1945 ended the second world war however it took a turn for International relations. As Hitler was seen as the common enemy, the USA and USA no longer had a common aim. This brought back the mistrust and suspicion in Europe that existed before the Munich Agreement. ?In Taylor?s opinion, none of the great powers wanted a war, but all of the great powers wished to increase their power relative to the others.? Europe was left without a dictator after Hitler?s defeat which led to a power vacuum, and as the Superpowers did not trust one another , this took a turn for International relations. ...read more.

Middle

Bismarck?s alliance system left other countries in Europe feeling threatened which led to other alliances being made. The tangle of alliances fell apart when Bismarck retired , it divided Europe between two rival military alliances. This eventually led to the First world war. The Defeat of Germany later in 1945 was a result of the alliance system, the alliance system had an impact on International relations as it was one of the causes of the First world war. Herman and Stevenson blamed the outbreak of war in 1914 entirely on the creation of Bismarck?s Alliance system. It cannot be regarded as the turning point, It did however divide Europe by Alliances, but The Defeat of Germany clearly divided Europe politically, militarily and economically. The aftermath of the First World War had its own turn for international relations. The Treaty of Versailles was a punishment for Germany after the first world war. The Treaty of Versailles was the peace settlement signed after World War One had ended in 1918 and in the shadow of the Russian Revolution and other events in Russia. The treaty required Germany to pay reparations to the allies, however it was difficult for Germany to do so, as most of their areas which produced precious raw materials were divided by Europe. Also with the need to recover their own economy it was difficult for the Germans to actually pay these reparations. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Defeat of Germany and how the superpowers dealt with the country not isolated and resented Germany but caused controversy within the ?allies?. Their common aim to control Germany led to the Superpowers turning against one another. Ideologies were formed and this eventually led to the Cold War. The defeat of Germany was the most crucial turning point for International relations as it was such a major event in history which started off the cracks within International relations. American historian David Fromkin has allocated blame for the outbreak of war entirely to Germany and Austria-Hungary in his 2004 book Europe's Last Summer. http://www.nato.int/docu/update/45-49/1949e.htm NATO 1949 Herman and Stevenson argued that blame for the outbreak of war in 1914 lay on the existence of an ever powerful and rigid alliance system A.J.P. Taylor's ?Railroad Thesis?. In Taylor?s opinion, none of the great powers wanted a war, but all of the great powers wished to increase their power relative to the others. 1961 Fritz Fischer wrote the enormously influential Griff nach der Weltmacht in which he blamed Germany for the war. Fischer believed that many members of the German government had overtly expansionist plans, formulated in the aftermath of social democratic gains in the election of 1912. He alleged that they hoped to use external expansion and aggression to check internal dissent and democratization American historian David Fromkin has allocated blame for the outbreak of war entirely to Germany and Austria-Hungary in his 2004 book Europe's Last Summer. ...read more.

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