• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far was the defeat of Germany in 1945 the most important turning point on International relations in the period 1879 1980?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far was the defeat of Germany in 1945 the most important turning point on International relations in the period 1879 ? 1980? There was continuous unrest regarding International relations during the period 1879-1980. The defeat of Germany in 1945 by far was the most important turning point. The defeat let to the rise of the superpowers and the development of communism and capitalism, also the division of Europe and also produced a global power vacuum. Other factors that can be considered as a turning point on International relations is the Origins of the first world war which was the consequence of the alliance system. The Treaty of Versailles also played it part as it led to the first world war, furthermore the development of the Cold War and the Munich agreement had an impact on International relations during the given period. The defeat of Germany in 1945 ended the second world war however it took a turn for International relations. As Hitler was seen as the common enemy, the USA and USA no longer had a common aim. This brought back the mistrust and suspicion in Europe that existed before the Munich Agreement. ?In Taylor?s opinion, none of the great powers wanted a war, but all of the great powers wished to increase their power relative to the others.? Europe was left without a dictator after Hitler?s defeat which led to a power vacuum, and as the Superpowers did not trust one another , this took a turn for International relations. ...read more.

Middle

Bismarck?s alliance system left other countries in Europe feeling threatened which led to other alliances being made. The tangle of alliances fell apart when Bismarck retired , it divided Europe between two rival military alliances. This eventually led to the First world war. The Defeat of Germany later in 1945 was a result of the alliance system, the alliance system had an impact on International relations as it was one of the causes of the First world war. Herman and Stevenson blamed the outbreak of war in 1914 entirely on the creation of Bismarck?s Alliance system. It cannot be regarded as the turning point, It did however divide Europe by Alliances, but The Defeat of Germany clearly divided Europe politically, militarily and economically. The aftermath of the First World War had its own turn for international relations. The Treaty of Versailles was a punishment for Germany after the first world war. The Treaty of Versailles was the peace settlement signed after World War One had ended in 1918 and in the shadow of the Russian Revolution and other events in Russia. The treaty required Germany to pay reparations to the allies, however it was difficult for Germany to do so, as most of their areas which produced precious raw materials were divided by Europe. Also with the need to recover their own economy it was difficult for the Germans to actually pay these reparations. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Defeat of Germany and how the superpowers dealt with the country not isolated and resented Germany but caused controversy within the ?allies?. Their common aim to control Germany led to the Superpowers turning against one another. Ideologies were formed and this eventually led to the Cold War. The defeat of Germany was the most crucial turning point for International relations as it was such a major event in history which started off the cracks within International relations. American historian David Fromkin has allocated blame for the outbreak of war entirely to Germany and Austria-Hungary in his 2004 book Europe's Last Summer. http://www.nato.int/docu/update/45-49/1949e.htm NATO 1949 Herman and Stevenson argued that blame for the outbreak of war in 1914 lay on the existence of an ever powerful and rigid alliance system A.J.P. Taylor's ?Railroad Thesis?. In Taylor?s opinion, none of the great powers wanted a war, but all of the great powers wished to increase their power relative to the others. 1961 Fritz Fischer wrote the enormously influential Griff nach der Weltmacht in which he blamed Germany for the war. Fischer believed that many members of the German government had overtly expansionist plans, formulated in the aftermath of social democratic gains in the election of 1912. He alleged that they hoped to use external expansion and aggression to check internal dissent and democratization American historian David Fromkin has allocated blame for the outbreak of war entirely to Germany and Austria-Hungary in his 2004 book Europe's Last Summer. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To what extent is the oil crisis of 1973 a turning point in postwar ...

    5 star(s)

    Today, its aims have expanded to beyond that. Currently, it has expanded to become the G-8(including Russia) and provides a forum for world leaders to collaborate on collective problems, to manage the world economy, and to address issues arising from interdependence and globalization e.g.

  2. Free essay

    The development of the international economy in the period 1945-2000 favoured rich countries at ...

    4 star(s)

    The highly homogenized uniform remedy of development proliferated Western ideals and thus the abandonment of traditional structures. Furthermore, WB operations were subverted to US Cold War policies in the 1970s as resources were mobilised as a vehicle for militant US policy aboard.

  1. This graduation paper is about U.S. - Soviet relations in Cold War period. Our ...

    of unwashed Genghis Khan with blood dripping from his fingertips" could not believe that he had changed his colors overnight and was now to be viewed as a gentle friend. Many Americans believed that they were saving the Soviet Union with their supplies, without recognizing the extent of Soviet suffering

  2. Why did tension increase in Europe between 1900 and 1914?

    The war in the air * The first air raid of the war was on Paris on 30 August 1914. From September British planes raided German airfields and in December 1914 German planes carried out an air raid on Dover.

  1. Assessing the impact of the first world war on international relations in the decade ...

    He wanted the Bolsheviks to gain peace so that there could have been a time to organize and strengthen itself within Russia.4Frankly speaking, the Russians were not happy with it and it was very likely that they would reclaim their land as seen by Stalin's aims of recouping most of

  2. Superpower Relations 1945-90

    o After Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, the USSR had to bear greater hardships than the other Allies: * 26,000,000 died - far more than all the western Allies put together; * Stalin kept urging the West to invade France to relieve the burden on Russia.

  1. To what extent were germany to blame for the outbreak of ww1

    They believed that by mobilising Germany had in affect declared war. I would strongly agree with this. I am aware, however some historians would disagree as in the 1920's and 1930's the idea of a more general responsibility gained ground in both political and academic cities.

  2. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    Marada was Franjieh's militia commanded by his son Tony. By the spring of 1978 Franjieh had asked the Phalange to pull out of the north so as to leave Tony in charge of the area. By now the Phalange were losing men daily as they were picked off by Marada,

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work