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How Far was the Failure of the Ludendorff Offensive the Main Reason for Germanys surrender in 1918?

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Introduction

3/ How Far was the Failure of the Ludendorff Offensive the Main Reason for Germanys surrender in 1918? There were many contributing factors to Germanys surrender in 1918. The first of which became apparent shortly after the start of the war, the schlieffen plan had failed. Germany was forced to have a war on two fronts, forcing a divide of the army and hence weakening it. They were forced into a long drawn out trench warfare on the western front; this was not the quick and easy war that the Germans had planned. The British enforced a blockade on Germany preventing vital supplies such as food getting into Germanys ports. ...read more.

Middle

Unfortunately for Germany, Britain enforced a convoy system just in time to save them from defeat and continuing the long drawn out war. In 1917 the Americans eventually entered into the war. This was great relief for the allies and a major problem for the Germans. The Americans were able to ship in troops of up to 50,000 a week and could provide money and supplies towards the war. With this great amount of power behind them the Americans were going to prove to strong for the Germans and were sure to be one of the deciding factors in the outcome of the war. After years of stalemate on the western front, things looked like they would come to an end with the Americans entry to the war. ...read more.

Conclusion

The main reason for the defeat of Germany should not simply be seen as the last major event before their defeat but should be looked into in more detail. Germany launched the Ludendorff offensive because it looked as tough they would fall, America had entered the war and with the ability to bring up to 50,000 men into the war a week, it would not be long before Germany surrendered. Germanys defeat was inevitable, the Ludendorff offensive simply drew it out, with Americas aid the Allies were certain to win Ludendorff offensive or not. This is why Americas entry should be seen as the main reason for defeat, not the Ludendorff offensive. Word count = 600 Robert Bentham Candidate No. 9318 Centre No. 16327 ...read more.

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