• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far were the forces opposed to civil rights responsible for the failure of the civil rights movement in the 1960s?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐How far were the forces opposed to civil rights responsible for the failure of the civil rights movement in the 1960s? Forces opposing the civil rights movement played a substantial role in the failures of the civil rights movement during the 1960s. The interference of the media led to negative portrayal of black civil rights activists. The radicalisation of some civil rights groups meant that sympathy from white supporters was diminishing and President Johnson?s broken promises of the ?Great Society? meant that it was more difficult for the civil rights movement to succeed. Not only were the opposing forces to blame for the failures in the 1960s, there were other external factors which, unquestionably, had an equally significant effect on the successes civil rights groups. Despite the majority of the civil rights campaigns failing, there were a few important victories for the civil rights movement during the 60s such as the Birmingham Campaign in which the brutality of racist police forces in the south was highlighted to of millions of people, and the March on Washington, where the success of peaceful protest was demonstrated. According to Vivienne Sanders ?after 1965 it became hard to do more? (for black people) ...read more.

Middle

Although he undoubtedly supported black civil rights, he did little to improve the social and economic problems faced by black Americans despite his idea for the ?Great Society?. Both presidents Johnson and Kennedy made important advances with civil rights politically but the problems faced in the North were much more difficult to deal with as the discrimination faced by black people was found in employment and housing. The vast majority of the black population in certain states were confined to the ghettos. Although the opposing forces towards the civil rights movement were considerably responsible for a lot of the failures during the 1960s, there were other important factors which possibly held more responsibility towards the failings of the civil rights movement. The Vietnam War had a huge impact on the advancement of black civil rights as, primarily, it diverted attention and resources away from the movement. The disproportionate number of black people being drafted into the army to fight reflected the social and economic problems present in America at the time. $21 billion was spent on the war, money which could have been used to provide better education, housing and wages for black people. When King spoke out against the war it not only ?heightened tensions between himself and the NAACP?[5], but ruined his relations with President Johnson. ...read more.

Conclusion

The opposition that civil rights groups faced meant that it was difficult to get funding and relations with the federal government worsened. However factors such as the Vietnam war meant that huge amounts of money that could have contributed to improving living conditions of black Americans were wasted, and tensions between groups led to ideas of separatism and in turn gave black activists a poor reputation. Ultimately, the social and economic problems faced by America combined with the Vietnam War meant that black Americans were not provided with enough money for acceptable housing or education. Despite pressure from all of the civil rights groups, it was difficult to enforce this sort of change as people were not prepared to invest in improving civil rights for black Americans, which led to many failures of civil rights groups during the 60s. ________________ [1] Race Relations in the USA since 1900 by Vivienne Sanders [2] Civil Rights in the USA 1863-1980 by David Paterson, Doug and Susan Willoughby [3] Civil Rights in the USA 1863-1980 by David Paterson, Doug and Susan Willoughby [4] Race Relations in the USA since 1900 Vivienne Sanders [5] Pursuing Life and Liberty: Equality in the USA 1945-1968 by Robin Bunce and Laura Gallagher [6] Race Relations in the USA since 1900 by Vivienne Sanders page 104 [7] Pursuing Life and Liberty: Equality in the USA 1945-1968 by Robin Bunce and Laura Gallagher ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent were Malcolm X and the subsequent Black Power Movement the 'Evil ...

    4 star(s)

    "Racial discrimination was less flagrant outside the South, but it was real and persuasive".19 What King strived for in voting rights and legal equality was not what the majority of African Americans needed. For Malcolm X "it was an opportunity for these people to shape their own destiny."20 Malcolm X's

  2. Peer reviewed

    How effective was the early civil rights movement in advancing Black Civil Rights in ...

    3 star(s)

    Alex Mcbride would appear to agree with this statement. Until the mid-twentieth century, Plessy v. Ferguson gave a "constitutional nod" to racial segregation in public places, foreclosing legal challenges against increasingly-segregated institutions throughout the South. The railcars in Plessy notwithstanding, the black facilities in these institutions were decidedly inferior to white ones, creating a kind of racial caste society.

  1. Revision notes - the USA 1945 to 1980

    However the non violent protests had an effect and by 1961 the New president Kennedy had committed himself to bringing in a civil rights bill which would outlaw all forms of segregation and discrimination. Kennedy also said he wanted to increase the number of Blacks who could vote, as this would ensure they had a voice in their communities.

  2. Compare the aims, methods and achievements of MLK and Malcolm X. Which man do ...

    I would contend that a policy of non-violence was to prove crucial in the 1960s, and that a period of education of white America such as that seen in the cultural expansion of the 1920's Harlem Renaissance was important in the meeting of the target of Civil Rights.

  1. Short term impact of Malcolm X

    Malcolm spoke in New York to teenagers from Mississippi, he was an inspiration to the students "One of the first things I think young people, especially nowadays, should learn is how to see for yourself and listen for yourself and think for yourself.

  2. To what extent was WW2 the most significant turning point for civil rights

    Malcolm X and Martin Luther King are often regarded as the two most significant leaders of the African American civil rights movement, and their victories were tremendous. The Brown v Board of education case marked the beginning of a series of mass forced instances of desegregation around the country.

  1. How far was Martin Luther King's leadership responsible for the gains made by the ...

    control and ordered them to protect the black students because Faubus used the National Guard to prevent the black students from entering Little Rock High school. In taking the National Guard under presidential control, the campaign gained the authority of the US president, in itself increasing the recognition and the success for campaign.

  2. How Far Did Black Power Hinder Civil Rights In The 1960s?

    On the other hand during its short life black power managed to significantly improve the lifestyle of many northern black Americans living in ghettoes; through its encouragement of Black Nationalism many people now became proud of their identity and culture.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work