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How far were the forces opposed to civil rights responsible for the failure of the civil rights movement in the 1960s?

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Introduction

´╗┐How far were the forces opposed to civil rights responsible for the failure of the civil rights movement in the 1960s? Forces opposing the civil rights movement played a substantial role in the failures of the civil rights movement during the 1960s. The interference of the media led to negative portrayal of black civil rights activists. The radicalisation of some civil rights groups meant that sympathy from white supporters was diminishing and President Johnson?s broken promises of the ?Great Society? meant that it was more difficult for the civil rights movement to succeed. Not only were the opposing forces to blame for the failures in the 1960s, there were other external factors which, unquestionably, had an equally significant effect on the successes civil rights groups. Despite the majority of the civil rights campaigns failing, there were a few important victories for the civil rights movement during the 60s such as the Birmingham Campaign in which the brutality of racist police forces in the south was highlighted to of millions of people, and the March on Washington, where the success of peaceful protest was demonstrated. According to Vivienne Sanders ?after 1965 it became hard to do more? (for black people) ...read more.

Middle

Although he undoubtedly supported black civil rights, he did little to improve the social and economic problems faced by black Americans despite his idea for the ?Great Society?. Both presidents Johnson and Kennedy made important advances with civil rights politically but the problems faced in the North were much more difficult to deal with as the discrimination faced by black people was found in employment and housing. The vast majority of the black population in certain states were confined to the ghettos. Although the opposing forces towards the civil rights movement were considerably responsible for a lot of the failures during the 1960s, there were other important factors which possibly held more responsibility towards the failings of the civil rights movement. The Vietnam War had a huge impact on the advancement of black civil rights as, primarily, it diverted attention and resources away from the movement. The disproportionate number of black people being drafted into the army to fight reflected the social and economic problems present in America at the time. $21 billion was spent on the war, money which could have been used to provide better education, housing and wages for black people. When King spoke out against the war it not only ?heightened tensions between himself and the NAACP?[5], but ruined his relations with President Johnson. ...read more.

Conclusion

The opposition that civil rights groups faced meant that it was difficult to get funding and relations with the federal government worsened. However factors such as the Vietnam war meant that huge amounts of money that could have contributed to improving living conditions of black Americans were wasted, and tensions between groups led to ideas of separatism and in turn gave black activists a poor reputation. Ultimately, the social and economic problems faced by America combined with the Vietnam War meant that black Americans were not provided with enough money for acceptable housing or education. Despite pressure from all of the civil rights groups, it was difficult to enforce this sort of change as people were not prepared to invest in improving civil rights for black Americans, which led to many failures of civil rights groups during the 60s. ________________ [1] Race Relations in the USA since 1900 by Vivienne Sanders [2] Civil Rights in the USA 1863-1980 by David Paterson, Doug and Susan Willoughby [3] Civil Rights in the USA 1863-1980 by David Paterson, Doug and Susan Willoughby [4] Race Relations in the USA since 1900 Vivienne Sanders [5] Pursuing Life and Liberty: Equality in the USA 1945-1968 by Robin Bunce and Laura Gallagher [6] Race Relations in the USA since 1900 by Vivienne Sanders page 104 [7] Pursuing Life and Liberty: Equality in the USA 1945-1968 by Robin Bunce and Laura Gallagher ...read more.

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