• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far would you agree that Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest success in foreign policy in the period 1922-38?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far would you agree that Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest success in foreign policy in the period 1922-38? I disagree with the above statement. It is my opinion that Mussolini's involvement within Abyssinia was not his greatest foreign policy success. At home, it brought him praise and merit - the movement of Fascism was now more popular within Italy than ever before. Despite this, his international reputation was damaged and his relationship with Britain and France, and it could be argued that Abyssinia was the "beginning of the end" for Mussolini. The victory avenged the humiliating defeat that Italian forces suffered at the hands of Abyssinian tribes in 1896 at Adowa - in addition to this, the victory strengthened Italy's position within Africa and expanded her colonies. Italy was now considered to be an imperial power in Africa, just like Britain and France were. All of these had been long-held aims of Italian Nationalists, and the achievement brought Mussolini praise and adoration of the Italian people. ...read more.

Middle

The fact that both the Locarno and Stresa conferences were held in Italy further enhanced the belief that Italy was now a leading power in European and International affairs. In addition to the successes mentioned above, Mussolini also achieved great success when he acquired the coastal town of Fiume in the 1924 Pact of Rome. This agreement with the newly formed Yugoslavia saw them hand over control of Fiume, a long-held target of Italian territorial ambitions, to Italy. He was praised for standing up for Italy and for his achievement through diplomatic methods. Another of his foreign policy successes was the acquirement of Albania as a satellite state. The Italian government supplied Ahmed Zog with money and employed Italian officers as advisors to the Albanian army. Italy's involvement with Albania posed a military threat to Yugoslavia, while at the same time strengthening Italy's position in the Balkans. Mussolini had been angry that France's involvement in the Balkans was undermining Italy's strength in the region. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Italian attack had united Ethiopia's warring tribes and their guerrilla attacks were difficult for the inexperienced Italian forces to deal with. Internationally, Mussolini's reputation plummeted and the reaction had not been the one that he had expected. He was condemned for his attack on Ethiopia, who was at the time a member of the League of Nations. This led to sanctions being imposed on Italy and meant that no country was allowed to carry out arms sales with Italy and League of Nations members banned the import of Italian goods. This was a further blow to the already ailing Italian economy. In conclusion, I do not agree with the comment "Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest foreign policy success in the period 1922-38". The obvious successes cannot be ignored, but these successes were clearly exaggerated by Mussolini's excellent application of propaganda. With regards to Abyssinia, the effect it has on Italy's economy and the damage it does to Mussolini's reputation outweigh the successes. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Assess the successes and failures of Mussolini's domestic policy.

    5 star(s)

    As for his economic policy as a whole, autarky was not negative in any way, it simply left the economy to be very stagnant; there was only a 0.8% annual productivity growth, a big difference from the rate of 3.8% before and after the fascist regime, 1901-25 and 1940-52.

  2. To What Extent Did Mussolini Achieve his Foreign Policy Aims of making Italy "Great ...

    Mussolini wanted to use the Balkan States as client states. At first he used peaceful means, he drew up a commercial agreement with Czechoslovakia and formalised a friendship treaty with Yugoslavia. However, he then over-reached himself in a sudden lunge for territory and glory.

  1. Reasons for Napoleon's Success (to 1807).

    At the twin-battles of Jena-Auerstadt in 1806 the Prussians, on the move, were surrounded and, worse still, found themselves facing the wrong way as the French attacked and the battle began. The Prussians still operating in accordance with the teachings of Frederick the Great (most of their generals had learnt their craft in his campaigns)

  2. Hitlers Germany

    past that had set in right after the collapse of Nazism in 1945. Although the Bonn government instituted a program of reparations called Wiedergutmachung, aimed at compensating the victims of Nazism, particularly the Jews, for damages to life, health, freedom, or property incurred at the hands of the Nazis, most Germans (East or West)

  1. Mussolini(TM)s rise to power up to 1922 owes more to the failures of others ...

    could have continued along a democratic course; Martin Clark stresses this point in his book Modern Italy7. In January 1921 the Socialist party split, after which Italy had a very small Communist party which was partly financed by Russia. It was too small to be a real threat to the Fascists but presented them with an ideal propaganda opportunity.

  2. Why was the league so ineffective in dealing with the Abyssinian Crisis?

    However, the sanctions were not placed upon the essentials for war, iron, coal and oil because Britain and France were worried about provoking Mussolini any more than they had to.

  1. Why was the league so ineffective in dealing with the Abyssinian Crisis?

    However, the sanctions were not placed upon the essentials for war, iron, coal and oil because Britain and France were worried about provoking Mussolini any more than they had to.

  2. "How far do the sources suggest consistent aims in Mussolini's foreign policy 1922-1939?"

    Of course this was not true. The source suggests that one of Mussolini's foreign policy aims was to create an Empire, as with source 2, and to increase international prestige. All six sources show us that there is a wide range of judgment about Mussolini's foreign policy.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work