• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How far would you agree that Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest success in foreign policy in the period 1922-38?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How far would you agree that Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest success in foreign policy in the period 1922-38? I disagree with the above statement. It is my opinion that Mussolini's involvement within Abyssinia was not his greatest foreign policy success. At home, it brought him praise and merit - the movement of Fascism was now more popular within Italy than ever before. Despite this, his international reputation was damaged and his relationship with Britain and France, and it could be argued that Abyssinia was the "beginning of the end" for Mussolini. The victory avenged the humiliating defeat that Italian forces suffered at the hands of Abyssinian tribes in 1896 at Adowa - in addition to this, the victory strengthened Italy's position within Africa and expanded her colonies. Italy was now considered to be an imperial power in Africa, just like Britain and France were. All of these had been long-held aims of Italian Nationalists, and the achievement brought Mussolini praise and adoration of the Italian people. ...read more.

Middle

The fact that both the Locarno and Stresa conferences were held in Italy further enhanced the belief that Italy was now a leading power in European and International affairs. In addition to the successes mentioned above, Mussolini also achieved great success when he acquired the coastal town of Fiume in the 1924 Pact of Rome. This agreement with the newly formed Yugoslavia saw them hand over control of Fiume, a long-held target of Italian territorial ambitions, to Italy. He was praised for standing up for Italy and for his achievement through diplomatic methods. Another of his foreign policy successes was the acquirement of Albania as a satellite state. The Italian government supplied Ahmed Zog with money and employed Italian officers as advisors to the Albanian army. Italy's involvement with Albania posed a military threat to Yugoslavia, while at the same time strengthening Italy's position in the Balkans. Mussolini had been angry that France's involvement in the Balkans was undermining Italy's strength in the region. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Italian attack had united Ethiopia's warring tribes and their guerrilla attacks were difficult for the inexperienced Italian forces to deal with. Internationally, Mussolini's reputation plummeted and the reaction had not been the one that he had expected. He was condemned for his attack on Ethiopia, who was at the time a member of the League of Nations. This led to sanctions being imposed on Italy and meant that no country was allowed to carry out arms sales with Italy and League of Nations members banned the import of Italian goods. This was a further blow to the already ailing Italian economy. In conclusion, I do not agree with the comment "Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest foreign policy success in the period 1922-38". The obvious successes cannot be ignored, but these successes were clearly exaggerated by Mussolini's excellent application of propaganda. With regards to Abyssinia, the effect it has on Italy's economy and the damage it does to Mussolini's reputation outweigh the successes. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Reasons for Napoleon's Success (to 1807).

    In 1805, for instance, half the total strength of the army had fought under Napoleon at Marengo (1800), and a quarter had served in the Revolutionary wars; most of the officers and non-commissioned officers were experienced campaigners, although a high proportion of the rank and file were raw conscripts.

  2. Mussolini(TM)s rise to power up to 1922 owes more to the failures of others ...

    Even as the natural enemies of the Fascists, the left did very little to prevent them entering government and often, as shown by the Alliance of Labour strike, their attempts even helped the Fascists. Even with the limited opposition, the Fascists were by no means unbeatable and in 1922 Mussolini's authority within the party was incredibly weak.

  1. To What Extent Did Mussolini Achieve his Foreign Policy Aims of making Italy "Great ...

    This meant that Italy was dependent on British and French goodwill. However, by the 1930's, the makeweight policy could be revived as Hitler rebuilt Germany. Mussolini gave foreign affairs a central importance, as he believed it to be the route for Italy to become great and respected.

  2. Why was the league so ineffective in dealing with the Abyssinian Crisis?

    So basically it was because Britain and France were too worried about what might happen to them if Italy wasn't on their side. And they were worried about this because they were scared of Germany, and if Germany attacked they wanted Italy as an ally.

  1. "The most important aim of foreign policy 1933-1936 was to overthrow the terms of ...

    This put Britain in a risky position as firstly this was very much against the TOV and it also shows that Britain was in favour of proposed German rearmament programs. Resulting from this pact, France and Italy both dropped any planned for action that they had in mind.

  2. 'PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS OUTWEIGHED IDEOLOGY IN FOREIGN POLICY' IN RELATION TO GERMANY IN THE YEARS ...

    Hitler merely acted on a situation that already existed and twisted it to suit his grander plan. Nether less, the policy of supporting the German faction was a policy that Hitler created on the basis of the grower support in Czechoslovakia for it's re-unification with Germany.

  1. Hitlers Germany

    In order to lend respectability and credibility to the proceedings, this trial was presided over by a lord justice of Great Britain, flanked by eight Allied judges and assisted by a judge of the United States Supreme Court who served as chief prosecutor.

  2. To what extent would you agree that Mussolinis invasion of Abyssinia was his greatest ...

    It cost around forty million lire to fund and severely dented Italy?s already limited military resources. Some Italians, no doubt, had been taken in by the orchestrated press campaign stressing Italy?s right to an East African Empire and suggesting the presence of enormous quantities of valuable resources, and precious metals in Ethiopia, but many remained unenthusiastic.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work