• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How important was James Is attempt to obtain a union between England and Scotland in causing difficulties with his first parliament in the years 1604 to 1611

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

1 (b) How important was James I's attempt to obtain a union between England and Scotland in causing difficulties with his first parliament in the years 1604 to 1611? From start of this period, right through to the end, James constantly faced difficulties with parliament. These difficulties weren't simply limited to his determination to seek a union with Scotland, there were far more issues and instances which caused difficulties with parliament such as clashes between royal prerogative and parliamentary privilege, finance and how James raised money. James' proposition for union with Scotland caused many difficulties with parliament as he was hugely enthusiastic about it, yet on the other hand parliament despised the thought of it. Tension arose between James and parliament after great hostility in Parliament and much criticism of the King, souring James's attitude towards Parliament. ...read more.

Middle

Another right of the crown, the system of wardships was out-dated and hated by parliament, they proposed to buy out and abolish the court of wards, although the king outright rejected as he saw it a challenge to his prerogative. Further opposition to James arose when impositions, extra custom duties were established following the Bates' case in 1606. Parliament stridently complained and objected to the fact that the crown had the right to impose extra duties on already accepted customs. By far the biggest financial issue was James' extravagance and conspicuous consumption. He overspent considerably - the cost of the royal household rose from �64,000 1603, to �114,000 1610. As a result, James had to raise money; the treasurer had proposed the Great Contract. Feudal dues would be exchanged for a yearly fixed sum. Under the proposals tension had accumulated as James' as critical and demanding approach towards parliament angered them. ...read more.

Conclusion

The root of all James' problems was his personality. The reason why the issue over union was so prolonged and tense was that James believed he was he was destined to bring about union because of his royal descent and to play the part of 'Rex Pacificus'. He was a firm believer in the divine right of the kings, so having such financial benefits was part of his prerogative, he should not have to bargain it. If there were any conflicts with parliamentary privileges, he believed his prerogative stood above this as was his claim that the monarch was above the Law, and that his subjects' liberties and privileges only existed by his goodwill, not by right. His personality contained his weakness for weakness for young handsome men, who he spent ridiculous amounts on and allowed real political power and influence. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. How far were James I's problems inherited, how far of his own making?

    his that the law was a technical subject which required long and rigorous training. Indeed it has been said that the 'alienated intellectuals' of Jacobean England were not confined to the universities; one of them sat on the throne8. This was more than merely a personal consideration - a great

  2. The Portrait of a Lady. Discuss James representations of 'places' for women in this ...

    Miss Imran Hussain Henry James Havisham is presented as the embodiment of women's failure to properly manage wealth and property. Mr. Havisham's settlement of the bulk of his estate on his daughter, despite the existence of a male heir, is unconventional, as the property system operated on a patrilineal basis.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work