• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How important was Lenin to the success of the October 1917 Revolution?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How important was Lenin to the success of the October 1917 Revolution? (Consider Lenin's oratory, his leadership, his personality, his actions and other factors not down to Lenin) Just before the October 1917 revolution, Russia's people, its power and its future appeared rather unstable. Tsar Nicholas was no longer the Russian leader, and a general election was the only obvious next step in order for Russia to find them a new leader. Because the Tsar no longer had power over Russia, this allowed many people, originally exiled by the tsar, to return "home" to the country. Among the persons returning was Vladimir Lenin, who returned on April 3rd 1917. Lenin held a speech later that month, in which he set out his analysis of where Russian politics should develop. ...read more.

Middle

The German's had heard of Lenin's April Theses and liked his aims. This was because Germany had seen that Lenin wanted to pull out of the war, which was a good thing for the Germans as it meant that their opposition (Britain, France, etc.) would lose a powerful ally. Germany offered to fund the Bolsheviks to mount their publicity campaigns. Also, the speech had won the support of or increased the support of many peasants and workers throughout the nation. It created many people who had become dedicated to the revolution ideas. These people formed an army under the control of Leon Trotsky. They were known as the "Red Guard" (Red being the colour of the Bolshevik flag) and gave the Bolsheviks the military power to win a war. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lenin was a brilliant leader for the Bolsheviks. He was a professional revolutionary with an iron will, he was ruthless, a brilliant speaker, and a good planner with one particular aim which would provide the country with so much more - to overthrow the government. He was the forefront for the Bolsheviks and promoted them greatly. The Bolsheviks, extremely well led, and who now had a strong fit army, had several aims to help the country's people, had plans to set about a greater future for Russia and financial support of a strong foreign country, all thanks to their leader's great public speeches, and campaign. If it had not been for Lenin, the Bolsheviks would be slacking in some of the above categories, or not achieving what was desired. This almost certainly shows that Lenin was in fact extremely important to the 1917 revolution, because of the power that he brought and gave the Bolsheviks. Henry Hayhurst-France 10B ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. The 1917 Revolution.

    Huge crowds were there to greet him, but Lenin seemed to have little time for the formal speeches of welcome, and instead began to lecture his audience on the work which lay ahead of them. Soon he found himself at odds, not only with the Social Revolutionaries and Mensheviks, but also with many leading members of his own Bolshevik faction.

  2. Reasons for Napoleon's Success (to 1807).

    * Isolated and tired of war, Britain had little choice but to accept the peace of Amiens in March 1802. ii) The Third Coalition 1805 * In May 1803, after six months of deteriorating international relations, Britain declared war on France.

  1. How important was Lenin to the success of the October 1917 Revolution?

    This may have seemed rather strange at the time, as the Soviets did not necessarily support the Bolsheviks. However, it allowed Lenin the opportunity to get the Soviets 'on his side' because they wanted the power he said he would provide for them.

  2. The Significance of Lenin in the Bolshevik Revolution (1917-1923)

    realised the mistakes of the Provisional Government and controversially gave the peasants land, and regained land lost at Brest Litovsk. Lenin knew what kind of Russia he wanted and realised he would have to be ruthless, use terror and propaganda to achieve it.

  1. Lenin and the Bolshevik revolution.

    There were, in October, 15-20,000 Red Guards in Petrograd and between 10,000 and 15,000 in Moscow. Their numbers nationwide at the time of the revolution have been estimated at 70-100,000. Poorly trained and armed, they were a much less formidable force than either the sailors or the garrison troops, but the Bolsheviks nonetheless considered them to be an important asset.

  2. Hitlers Germany

    the period in comparison to any other period and prevented the historian from drawing comparisons between the deeds of Nazism and those of other totalitarian systems that engaged in similar genocidal activities. Nolte had written a comparative study of fascism in the 1960s in which he described fascism as a

  1. Unification of Germany - Factors of Success.

    He never forgot the humiliation?? of 1850 imposed by Austria but appointed right men in right positions????. He was determined to strengthen the Prussian army to achieve German unification with the help of Generals Moltke?? and von Roon??. Above all, his appointment of Bismarck in 1862 as Minister-President??

  2. Why did the Tsar lose power in 1917?

    Their military programme wouldn?t be ready until 1917. They also weren?t ready economically; Figes said ?war will necessitate expenditures which are beyond Russia?s financial means? stating that Russia couldn?t afford this war. Figes also said ?a European war is mortally dangerous for whomever wins? which is suggesting that even if

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work