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How important was politics & the power struggle in disputes between Charles & his opponents in the years 1640 " 1642

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Introduction

How important was politics & the power struggle in disputes between Charles & his opponents in the years 1640 - 1642 To fully understand the politics and the power struggle between Charles and his political opponents you have to look at a number of matters for example: The look on Divine right. This was a major issue in disputes as the king (Charles) didn't think parliament saw him as thee divine right king and took it to their own liberty to try and bypass the king's authorisation. With a matter of issues (Stafford's impeachment) the king was failing to realise the change in times and the beginning of a republic revolution and that the people wanted their say against matters and that the king was losing his power and influence over the people (as it will be shown in the civil war). But thanks to his advisors advice and the influence his wife also had kept the king on the tracks of 'he ...read more.

Middle

As told by many historians Charles had very inconsistent behaviour this proves to show that he wanted to patch together his disputes with parliament but at the same time trying to gain control of the arsenal's around the country so from this you can read between the lines that Charles was accepting advice and as stated all ready acting as a puppet for his advisors Pym was the main opposer to Charles and his advisors he had been the driving force behind parliamentary opposition to the king since the short parliament of 1640 he had been the main man to set up the winning clockworks to win the war and also was a true leader in parliament who held dividing sides of parliament together this was a pain to the king as he wanted a divide in parliament to use it as a way to cause unrest and a reason to close another session of parliament. ...read more.

Conclusion

war due to his provoking of matters this shows such importance In the power struggle and also in politics as this was the cause of such feuded between the king and parliament So from within this essay I have shown to as much as I can possible shown the importance between politics and a power struggle in the disputes between King Charles the 1st and his parliamentarian foes using methods of key issues and facts I know of to create this essay to put the matter of king Charles personal and parliament issues and in such a dispute causing the civil war to occur. Daniel whites essay on the importance of politics and the power struggle in disputes between Charles the 1st and his opponents (parliament) in the years of 1640-1642 in the current state of the English civil war showing how important politics was towards the start and finish of the English civil wars through the reign of Charles Words: 814 Lines: 82 ...read more.

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