• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How important was the strength of opposition to impact the New Deal in the period 1933-1937.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Investigation History- The New Deal How important was the strength of opposition to impact the New Deal in the period 1933-1937. The New Deal had serious competition, which was fundamental towards the New Deal particularly in the period of 1933-1937 in numerous ways. There were alternatives which factored towards helping the economy providing radical yet simplistic reforms, several pressure groups also hindered the success of the New Deal, it was scrutinized by both sides of the political spectrum where Hugh Brogan claims the "Left for not doing enough"1 this is true, certain left wing activists such as Francis Townsend2, Father Coughlin3 and Huey Long4 did not enhance their potential to cause everlasting impact. He also claims the "right for doing too much"5 this can be interpreted differently, but I partially agree that the Liberty League tried to prevent the success of the New Deal "as business leaders were not going to help him"6 this suggests the Right aimed to hinder rather than help the New Deal. The strength of opposition had potential to cause serious impact, this varied as some more than others contributed. It is unclear how opposition enforced certain policies, but they certainly cause change to some extent, where many were able to prosper, as it was clear that "society needs reform"7. ...read more.

Middle

considered to appeal to mainly the poor, but Roosevelt acknowledged this, I assume Roosevelt used Long's ideas compared to Townsend and Coughlin as he proved that policies actually worked thus most of his policies would have been employed in the New Deal. However he too seemed inadequate, as, "he was not offered a federal post"21 which suggests his contribution to the New Deal would have been minute. His significance in Louisiana was successful however it is questionable if his ideas would be embraced on a national level; I firmly believe his policies would not have been favorable, as it is evident because the 1936 election provided a strong belief in capitalism with 27 million Americans behind Roosevelt also it was suggested that it was "highly improbable"22 that he would of beaten Roosevelt in 1936 election this highlights his weaknesses when facing the New Deal, was not able to generate enough support which was also another problem with many opponents of the New Deal. Certainly from the Left they had "much in common"23 they all disliked Roosevelt, this was stated by Badger which I to some extent agree yet it is deemed that "they all addressed the real problems" and "the real Deal's failings" which supports the assertion of opposition being beneficial, highlighting the failures of the New Deal, clearly ...read more.

Conclusion

can be seen as restraining the success of the New Deal as they declared "11 out of 16 of the alphabet agencies were unconstitutional"31. Roosevelt believed the Supreme Court hindered rather than help the New Deal, Roosevelt tried to use a notion of "court packing"32 where judges over 70 should retire, however this backfired, arguably worsening his reputation, which reflected towards the New Deal badly, also considered to be the "darkest moment"33 of FDR's campaign, yet it is suggested that "Roosevelt responded with compromise"34 based on the context of the supreme court it clearly shows no compromise towards the Republican judges but its impact is shown however their contribution was . Roosevelt did handle his opponents effectively, it is claimed that FDR would "take the fire out of opposing arguments"35 by cooperation, which he successfully did with Townsend and Long, however there were times where he failed to understand the strength of opposition when it comes towards the Supreme Court, he was ambitious to limit their power however he did underestimate the strength In which they condemned Roosevelt's actions. The strongest opposition from the Left would be Huey Long, yet from the right it would be the Liberty League, In conclusion opposition to the New Deal was significant; they demonstrated a variety of alternatives which challenged the New Deal. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    The New Deal USA

    4 star(s)

    and 1,000 airports. It is evident that Roosevelt did provide new jobs during the 1930s, but he only gave "enough help...to enough people" to gain him credit as seen in Source A.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    much to the tastes of the American public, who had a strong belief in working one's way up the ladder, and in bettering oneself through hard work. Affirmative action was a clear way of showing that African Americans were equal to whites in the workplace, that they could work in

  1. History essay on the new deal

    They built 33 dams to control flooding of the river and produce electricity. There were also measures taken to improve the quality of the soil so that it could be used for farming again and a 650 mile waterway to link the river systems.

  2. Roosevelt's New Deal

    and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) of 1933 (provided an insurance of deposits in banks to a maximum of $100,000 per depositor, which meant that if the banks crashed, the government would compensate for the individuals' deposited money). This boosted the public's confidence and bank deposits, which restored the

  1. To What extent had the New Deal been successful in overcoming the Depression in ...

    and by the eighth day of Roosevelt's presidency, he had convinced the people that financial issues were being handled well. This resulted in people continuing to deposit their money in banks again and ceased any further run on the bank.

  2. Theodore Roosevelt

    Roosevelt's approach to foreign matters was "speak softly and carry a big stick." When it came to Europe, Roosevelt spoke softly and didn't get very involved. But he was determined to assert American power in the Western Hemisphere. After his election in 1904, he revealed the Roosevelt Corollary to the

  1. Asses the view that Hoovers policies and attitudes in the years 1929-33 merely prolonged ...

    Source 8 also believes that the Hawley-Smoot Tariff was significantly damaging towards Americans "which he signed despite the advice of most economists". This emphasises his attitudes towards his policies, he in his own "fantasy world" as source 7 also describes as he simple did not have any fixed approach towards fixing the damaged economy.

  2. How successful was Roosevelt in delivering relief, recovery and reform during the New Deal?

    reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression (Berkin, p. ). This is the starting point of his attempt to ?fix? the economy and help Americans to overcome the crisis. Relief As mentioned, the ?relief? stage aimed to provide aid to a vast number of people, who were

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work