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How Significant a Role did Britain Play in the War Against Germany, 1939 – 1945?

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Introduction

How Significant a Role did Britain Play in the War Against Germany, 1939 - 1945? I am going to try to answer this question with a short essay analysing Britain's contribution to the defeat of Germany. Obviously, Britain contributed in a variety of ways to the defeat of Germany. Britain contributed in the war at sea, land and air. Britain also played a major part in developing new technology and being an American launch pad. I will try to mention various ways that Britain contributed to the defeat of Germany with as little bias as possible. In 1940, Britain was the only country still fighting against Germany. If Britain had surrendered after Operation Dynamo then it would have been a lot harder for Germany to be defeated. Had the USA wished to attack Germany if Britain had surrendered the only way would be to send a huge armada of ships and landing craft across the Atlantic Ocean. This would result in huge casualties because there were German U-boats spread across the Atlantic Ocean and so many of the American ships would be sunk before they arrived in Europe. In addition, the Germans would have warning of the imminent attack and could deploy sea, land and air forces in the right places to crush the American attack. ...read more.

Middle

The loss of this battle was to have serious repercussions for Germany as the war progressed. In Operation Overlord Britain was in my opinion the most important country. Britain was very significant in establishing air superiority, which made D-Day possible. The Allies invaded with over 12,000 planes against only 300 German aircraft. Britain was used as a launch pad for American troops and planes. Britain and its empire provided more than half of the invasion forces and the troops were transported using British crafts. D-Day was the turning point of the land war against Germany. Stalin wanted the Western powers to open up a second front against Germany in the West to take some of the pressure of fighting Germany off Russia. Even though the Western front only tied up 25% of Germany's armies, it helped tactically because it meant that Germany now had to fight a war on two fronts. It was also very beneficial because it meant that American troops could now come directly from America to France instead of having to stop off at Britain. British technology was instrumental in the invasion of France. The British cracked the Enigma code so they could tell how the Germans were accepting their misinformation about where the invasion was going to take place. ...read more.

Conclusion

The U-boats or submarines were the main threat as they were harder to detect. Britain invented Huff Duff (a means of finding surfaced U-boats) and cracked the Enigma code machine so they could find out where German U-boats were being sent. Also the British used long range aircraft as cover for their convoys. These tactics and technologies, combined with America's huge manufacturing power defeated Germany at sea. However many ships Germany could sink, America could replace them. In conclusion, I think that the war against Germany could never have been won without Britain. Obviously there were other major roles played by the United States of America and the Soviet Union but Britain's role was necessary to defeat Germany. Britain may not have had millions of troops to defeat the German army but it played a major part in defeating the German air force and in keeping German U-boats at bay. It also made a land attack with American assistance possible because Britain is only a few miles away from France cross-Channel. Also Britain had a large empire from which it could call troops and resources which supported its war effort considerably. Britain contributed significantly in my view to the wars at sea, air and land especially with technological advances. 1,245 words ?? ?? ?? ?? Ahmed Luqman 1 ...read more.

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