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How significant was Lenin between the years 1902-1918 to the formation of the Bolshevik Government?

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Introduction

´╗┐By ?formation of the Bolshevik Government? (BG), we are referring to the October Revolution (OR) and lead up to it. Lenin?s significance throughout the timeframe, 1902-1918, to the formation of the BG has been characterised by theoretical and written works, outlining the Bolsheviks Party?s policy and methods, as well as impressive leadership in calling for, and achievement of, a socialist revolution. Yet, one must consider the influences and achievements of other individuals and factors; which undoubtedly aided the communists in their plight against the Provisional Government (PG). The adaptation of Marxism by Lenin to suit Russian circumstances, allowed him to apply Marxist principles to a social and economic context for which they had not been intended for. In Marxist theory, before a proletariat uprising could occur, first a Bourgeois Revolution (BR) must establish parliamentary democracy and full scale industrialisation, while removing feudalism and Absolute Monarchy. Russia, on the other hand, was still an autocratic, totalitarian, state with no civic freedoms; coupled with a feudal system: no revolution could happen until a BR was achieved. The Mensheviks wanted to have an alliance with the Liberals in order to bring about said revolution.1 Lenin refuted this idea, however, at the RSD?s Second Party Congress in 19032: his position being that the Liberals would make a deal with the monarchy. He laid out his views on Marxism in What Is To Be Done in 1902 ? ?adapting? the principle of revolution from below into revolution from above. In other words he advocated the recruiting of ?professional revolutionaries?3 ? who would form a ?Vanguard Party?4 ? reflecting the views of the workers, while at the same time excluding the ?organisation of workers?5 or trade unions from the political side of the struggle (see source 1). Conversely, Marx had in 1868 asserted that ?trade unions were the schools of socialism.?6 Lenin?s response was that the party should be comprised of purely professional full time activists, as they would have the experience and understanding to make it more difficult for the police to track them down; while the workers should participate in the economic struggle for higher wages. ...read more.

Middle

Lenin himself did not appear until the second session of the ARCS the next evening.33 Hence, Lenin needed Trotsky?s assistance in sanctioning a revolution and relied on him to exercise direct control over the operation details. Thus, Trotsky?s skill and leadership was significant to the formation of the BG. Overall, Lenin?s role in the formation of the BG from1902-1917 was of great significance. His reworking of Marxism so that it would hold relevance to the social and economic context of Russia in the early 20th century was his greatest achievement ? allowing the Bolshevik Marxists of his time to attain purpose as professional revolutionaries ? bringing about a communist revolution despite being in the midst of a bourgeoisie one. Lenin showed considerable political ability in appealing to the masses; his April Theses left the Bolsheviks as the only credible revolutionary party in the eyes of many ? thus gaining much needed support and increased membership. However, the role of other factors and individuals throughout the time period also assisted Lenin in his quest for communist dominance. The Kornilov coup, instead of crushing the Bolsheviks, actually strengthened them ? resulting in a better armed and led communist party. Additionally, Trotsky was a useful ally by Lenin?s side and certainly contributed to the formation of the BG: his help ensured the OR was brought forward and he had direct access to the planning and commencement of the hostilities. Although these other individuals and factors had a great significance on the revolution, it is imperative to remember that the original, keystone, idea of bring a communist revolution forward was Lenin?s. Bibliography Baggins, B., Ryan, S., Walters, D., Batur, S., Nehru, A., & Bismo, M. (2008). All-Russian Congress of the Soviet. Retrieved January 11, 2015, from The Encyclopedia of Marxism: https://www.marxists.org/glossary/events/a/arcs.htm#june-1917 Lenin, V. I. (1964). Collected Works June-September 1917 (Vol. 25). (S. Apresyan, & J. Riordan, Trans.) Moscow. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p12. 8 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p1 (1897 census). 9 Marx, K. (1848). The Communist Manifesto. p24. 10 Marx, K. (1848). The Communist Manifesto. p24. 11 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p32. 12 Lenin, V. I. (1964). Collected Works June-September 1917 (Vol. 25). (S. Apresyan, & J. Riordan, Trans.) Moscow. p237. 13 Wood, A. (2003). The Origins of the Russian Revolution 1861-1917 (3rd ed.). p52. 14 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p35. 15 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p35. 16 Oxley, P. (2001). Russia - From Tsars to Commissars 1855-1991. p99. 17 Russia Today. (2011). Prominent Russians: Lavr Kornilov. Retrieved January 11, 2015, from Russiapedia: http://russiapedia.rt.com/prominent-russians/military/lavr-kornilov/ 18 Russia Today. (2011). Prominent Russians: Lavr Kornilov. Retrieved January 11, 2015, from Russiapedia: http://russiapedia.rt.com/prominent-russians/military/lavr-kornilov/ 19 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p39. 20 Oxley, P. (2001). Russia - From Tsars to Commissars 1855-1991. p99. 21 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p35. 22 Oxley, P. (2001). Russia - From Tsars to Commissars 1855-1991. p99. 23 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p35. 24 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p35. 25 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p38. 26 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p38. 27 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p38. 28 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p83. 29 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p83. 30 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p83. 31 Baggins, B., Ryan, S., Walters, D., Batur, S., Nehru, A., & Bismo, M. (2008). All-Russian Congress of the Soviet. Retrieved January 11, 2015, from The Encyclopedia of Marxism: https://www.marxists.org/glossary/events/a/arcs.htm#june-1917 32 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p39?. 33 Wood, A. (1986). The Russian Revolution (2nd ed.). p41. --------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------- ------------------------------------------------------------ How significant was Lenin between the years 1902-1918 to the formation of the Bolshevik Government? 2 ...read more.

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