• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How significant was Piotr Stolypin in attempting to strengthen Tsarism between 1906 and 1911?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Olivia Clinton ________________ How significant was Piotr Stolypin in attempting to strengthen Tsarism between 1906 and 1911? ________________ Piotr Stolypin was a ?reforming conservative? who?s intentions, argued by Abraham Asher, were to ?save the tsarist regime and uphold its legacy?[1]. He was made prime minister of Russia by Tsar Nichloas II in 1906 and remained so until his assassination in September 1911. He first came to be noticed when he was the provincial governor of Sartov where he vigourously supressed peasant unrest. Just before he became prime minister, he was Mininster of the Interior, and he kept both roles. He was regarded as a ruthless prime minister that would go to any lengths to prevent the spread of revolutionaries. Stolypin saw the Duma as being a partner in building a strong Russia and his role within it was to attempt to strengthen the tsarist regime. He had strong opposition and so his political tactics were always complicated and favouring the uphold of the tsar, but with the constant motivation to modernise Russia. Stolypin?s agrarian reforms were to ensure that the majority of Russia?s population, the peasants, were supporting the tsar by attempting to improve their living standards. ...read more.

Middle

Robert Service says that he didn?t really ?revoke the October Manifesto?[14] in the speech, but this could be that Stolypin was carried away by that many of the Third Duma deputies were either conservative or aristocratic or both. In this speech he tried once again to get the Duma to pass the legislation confirming the agrarian reforms, suggesting that he was truly enthusiastic in enforcing them to help the peasantry. However, the was no fail to notice his renewed emphasis, right at the beginning of the speech, on governments intentions to use force to put down unrest by the ?foes of society[15]?, perhaps referring to the extremists to the left. The new Duma was perhaps more conservative which could have been why the members were more open to listening to him, a speech Stolypin made nine months earlier On March 6th 1907 had the same substance and tone but was met with harsher criticism. However it made Stolypin extremely popular with, according to V.V Shulgin a right wing deputy; ?[t]he army, the bureaucracy, the police and every citizen who didn?t want a revolution?[16] because of two significant words Stolypin said towards the end of his speech; ?Not afraid[17].? Stolypin?s agrarian reforms were ...read more.

Conclusion

Federation- Geoffrey Hosking [4] Russia Under Tsarism and Communism 1881-1953- Chris Corin- Terry Fiehn [5] Russia and the Russians- A history from RUS to the Russian Federation - Geoffrey Hosking [6] P. A. Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia- Abraham Ascher [7] Stolypin [8] The Revolution of 1905: A Short History- Abraham Ascher [9] Stolypin [10] Ibid [11] Origins of the Russian Revolution 1861-1917 ? Alan Wood [12] Ibid [13] Russia Under Tsarism and Communism 1881-1953- Chris Corin- Terry Fiehn [14] The Russian Revolution 1900-1927- Robert Service [15] Stolypin [16] Russia and the Russians- A history from RUS to the Russian Federation- Geoffrey Hosking ( V.V Shulgin) (Anonymous right wing deputy) [17] Stolypin [18] P. A. Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia- Abraham Ascher [19] Ibid [20] Stolypin (E.H CARR ? The Russian revolution from Lenin to Stalin 1917-1929) [21] The Russian Revolution 1900-1912 ? Robert Service (SM Dubrovskii- Stolypinskaya zemek naya referma (Moscow 1963)) [22] P. A. Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia- Abraham Asher [23] AS HISTORY Edexcel Guide ? Unit 1: Russia in Revolution, 1905-17 [24] Ibid [25] Ibid [26] Origins of the Russian Revolution 1861-1917- Alan Wood [27] Ibid ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Stalins Russia, 1924-53 revision guide

    * 1927 poor harvest. January 1928 Stalin visited western Siberia. He was convinced that the kulaks were keeping grain from the market to keep up prices. Stalin had police officials with him and he ordered the confiscation of grain; he was abandoning NEP.

  2. To What Extent Were the Reforms of Alexander II Intended to Preserve and Strengthen ...

    These reforms were all extraordinary as they show Alexander willingly allowing a new intelligentsia to be formed. Alexander was perfectly aware of this possibility but still he persisted and implemented all these reforms. The education reforms show Alexander opening himself up to criticism from a new forged class of educated Russians.

  1. Why did Tsarism survive the 1905 revolution but not the 1917?

    She allowed him to make key political decisions. The man was corrupt and used his power to spread corruption and get his friends important positions in the court. The Tsar was not the protector of the little people any more: Bloody Sunday had shattered that image.

  2. Why did Tsarism survive the revolution of 1905 but not that of March 1917

    It was difficult for the revolutionaries to be united because their different aims meant they were divided and often fought amongst them selves; the Liberals wanted to share power with the Tsar, the Social Revolutionaries wanted peasant ownership over land, and the Social Democrats wanted a complete change of society and removal of the Tsar.

  1. notes on russia. from tsarism to communism

    - Workers --> level of skill, education and sense of human dignity rose. Workers became more hostile to the humiliating treatment by the managers, low level of security, low pay and privileged life of the upper classes. � Coercive Tsarist forces: Their ability and willingness to crush unrest were becoming doubtful.

  2. Leni Riefenstahl The Propagandist or Artist? A Historiographical Debate.

    works and subsequent public person as well as her attributes and beliefs. THE PROPAGANDIST? * Riefenstahl Nazi films have been criticized as being reflections of Nazi ideology and as attempts to subliminally influence the German people, therefore being forms of propaganda.

  1. The Hidden Facets of Bolshevism - Friends and Foes of the Working Class.

    When one thinks of Lenin and his place in the Russian Revolution, one is reminded of Paul Johnson's account of a statue which, until the late fall of 1918, stood proudly before the entrance to the train station in Petrograd.

  2. How Successful Were The Agrarian Reforms of Stolypin 1906 - 1914?

    Also through the creation of the Kulaks, there was more support for the Tsar because the Kulaks didn?t want their wealth to disappear through the communist revolution. However, there were also significant failures with this reform. Firstly, the reforms didn?t address the key issue ?the redistribution of noble owned land; a land hunger still remained.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work