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How successful was Louis of imposing absolute control on government in the provinces?

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Introduction

How successful was Louis of imposing absolute control on government in the provinces? Louis throughout his reign was believed by his predecessors to be an absolute monarch but was this really true when put into practice. To achieve absolute power Louis needed more or less total control over everything that went on in the provinces. For example he needed to make sure the taxes which he imposed were being successfully collected and corruption was to a minimal. To some extent Louis was successful in imposing absolute power on the government in the provinces. He passed laws which they didn't like and they weren't allowed to remonstrate until the law was passed meaning no chance for real negotiation. Although to another extent his successes could have been limited as yes they weren't allowed to remonstrate until the law was passed but the parlements would still be informed about the policy and Louis would discuss it with them first hand showing the parlements still had some control. Furthermore some may say that Louis didn't mean or intend to enforce absolute control in the provinces. He saw the need for compromise and realised it was in his best interest to do so. To a certain degree Louis successfully imposed more control on the government in the provinces using his absolute powers. The government in France in the seventeenth century had many government bodies. Examples of these are the provincial governors and the parlements. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore the Intendants were only allowed to serve in a particular province for up to three years. Louis made sure they had no family or financial connection with these generalities. This helped Louis to gain absolute control over them. Making them only stay in a province for up to three years would allow Louis to stop the intendants from becoming attached to the province they are in. If the intendants were to stay in a province for too long they may become more lenient towards friends they may have made financial opportunities which could sway them from being loyal to the king. This allowed Louis to gain what he wanted out of the intendants such as they could spy on people in the provinces and see if they were being corrupt in any way. This allowed the king to control other people to as he would find out if a person is not obeying him first hand. Louis could then either punish them or give them are warning. Louis would issue the punishment showing his absolute power over the people and the government. The intendants would be more reliable if not in one place for too long allowing Louis to control them and the people in the provinces. No one would question Louis in the provinces and he made all decisions overall. This showed his absolute power over government in the provinces was successfully being imposed. On the other hand however to another degree Louis power was limited by certain factors. ...read more.

Conclusion

Similarly his economic position limited him from being successful in imposing his absolutism on the government. He didn't have the money to do what he wanted. Therefore he needed to keep the church and the government on side. Louis needed money to be raised for him for his own pleasure and for France to run smoothly. Provincial governors raised money for him, do he needed to keep him on side to ensure his taxes were being collected to a good standard. If Louis had the money to be an absolutist he could have been but his financial difficulties limited him. The church needed to be kept on side as they were a big influence on his tax and money income. The divine right of kings could have influenced Louis to try to be an absolute monarch but this could have limited him too. It meant he needed to put the interest of the people of France before his own. Divine right of kings for Louis could mean cooperation with god so shouldn't he cooperate with the people and government. On the contrary one might argue that it wasn't Louis intention to impose absolute control in the provinces. He recognised the need for compromise and conciliation and realised it was not in his best interest to simply dictate his will. Louis saw the need to discuss decisions with the government bodies for the country to run in the way he wanted. Trust between him and the government bodies would be a high. He liked being friends with some of the parlements and provincial government. Dictating to them rules and regulations and being overbearing would not allow this. ...read more.

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