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How successful was Mussolini in increasing the international prestige of Italy in the years 1922 - 43?

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Introduction

´╗┐How successful was Mussolini in increasing the international prestige of Italy in the years 1922 ? 43? Between the years 1923 ? 43, Benito Mussolini tried to create an international prestige to rival that of the historical image set by the grand Roman Empire. He introduced many policies and waged many wars over the years, to achieve this goal but inevitably Italy of the 20th Century could not compete with its former self and this led the fall of their dictator. When discussing the international prestige there are four main areas that need to be considered. There are successes and failures in Africa and the Mediterranean, their relationship with Britain, France and Germany as well as what happened with the League of Nations. Italy?s campaign in Africa did more damaged than good despite the claimed territory. ...read more.

Middle

The rest of the international community, especially members of the League of Nations, condemned the Blitzkrieg actions, which were taking place in Spain. The League also didn?t agree with Mussolini?s, seemingly rash decision to invade Corfu following the assassination of an Italian General. The only reason Italy withdrew her forces was from severe pressure from Britain and their Mediterranean naval fleet. The only real positive from Italy?s excursion in the Mediterranean was their attack on Yugoslavia with an aided hand from Albania. The League was not particularly concerned about this and Hitler was pleased that Italy was taking action as she pleased. Throughout these two campaigns in the Mediterranean and Africa, the relationship between the Nazis and the Fascists had continued to go from strength to strength, especially when the two sides supported one another in Abyssinia and the Spanish Civil War. ...read more.

Conclusion

Germaine following the end of the last World War. As we know from the out come of the war, Mussolini must have thoroughly regretted the distasteful relationship between the Fascists and the Allies. This had serious repercussions and due to the fact that the only country that fully supported Mussolini?s Italy was defeated, any chance of international prestige worldwide was gone. Overall, Mussolini was successful initially in improving Italian prestige, but this was a trend that did not continue. The consistent military failures of the Italian army, and Italy?s dependence on new-ally Germany (Pact of Steel 1939) undermined this and failed to bring Fascist Italy out of the shadows of its militarily stronger ally. By placing reliance on Germany, Italy isolated itself from the international community, and could never hope to achieve high levels of prestige whilst in the dark with Europe?s greatest threat of the time. Mussolini had the mouth of a prestigious European power, but lacked the military and resources to back it up. ...read more.

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