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How valuable is a field trip to the Tudor part of the Palace for finding out about how henry V111 used Hampton Court.

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Introduction

How valuable is a field trip to the Tudor part of the Palace for finding out about how henry V111 used Hampton Court. There are three ways in which we can find out how Henry V111 would have used Hampton Court: * Written sources both primary and secondary * Remaining Tudor palaces other than Hampton Court * Hampton Court itself. How was the Palace used? Hampton Court was like a small town. There was enough room for more than 1,000 people to eat, sleep and worship. A Tudor palace was not just the King's home. It was the centre of the government of the country when the king stayed there. It had to impress people by its size and splendour. Source 20 tells us that Hampton Court was one of the greater houses, one of the buildings where the King and hid court kept full estate, where he was seen in all his magnificence. Sources 21 and 22 show that Henry wanted to make his palace even more spectacular after the departure of Wolsey. Source 22 states that �62,000 was spent in building works over a decade, which is equivalent to �2,000,000 these days, which is an awful lot. Henry wasn't worried about the cost of making the palace the best as long as it was made the best. Once Henry had spent his lavish amount of money, he had created at Hampton Court what was universally regarded as his most magnificent house after Whitehall. Source 22 goes on to show how many were employed at the Palace. This is the list from a modern pamphlet about the Palace: 49 masons 52 bricklayers 52 carpenters 13 joiners 9 plumbers 12 sawyers 4 plasterers 141 labourers This to me shows that Henry wanted the best. He employed lots and lots of people to decorate and change the court. Henry didn't want any trace of Wolsey in his new glamorous palace. ...read more.

Middle

and Windsor Castle. Henry spent 811 days here during his 38-year reign, which suggests that, although he was a regular visitor, his stays were short. All his six wives came to the palace and most had new and lavish sets of lodgings. The King also rebuilt his own rooms at least half a dozen times. The palace not only provided public and private sets of lodgings for the King and queen but also accommodation for each of the King's children and for a large number of courtiers, visitors and servants. By the time Hampton Court Palace was finished in about 1540, it was one of the most modern, sophisticated and magnificent palaces in England. There were tennis courts, bowling alleys and pleasure gardens for recreation, a hunting park of more than 1,100 acres, kitchens covering 36,000 square feet, a fine chapel, a vast communal dining room (the Great Hall) and a multiple garderobe (or lavatory) - known as the Great House of Easement - which could sit 28 people at a time. In the early 1540s, all this was augmented by a new system, which brought water from Coombe Hill in Kingston, three miles away, by lead pipes. This perspective view of the Great Hall by John Vardy, 1749, was dedicated to George II. Henry used Hampton Court to impress, most famously in August 1546, when he feasted and f�ted the French ambassador, his retinue of 200 gentlemen and 1,300 members of his own court for six days. For the occasion, the palace was surrounded by an encampment of gold and velvet tents. Half a century later, the Tudor palace was still among the most impressive in Europe. The Duke of W�rttemberg, who visited Hampton Court in 1592 during Elizabeth I's reign, called it 'the most splendid and most magnificent royal edifice to be found in England, or for that matter in other countries'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion: Visiting Hampton Court is a wonderful experience, almost like walking through a living history book that gradually reveals snippets of information about the former occupants, their lifestyles, changing fashions and ideas, and the different phases of architecture. With beautiful gardens, and the famous maze, it is easy to spend a whole day exploring this majestic building standing on the banks of the River Thames. The managers at Hampton Court I feel have tried to keep the Tudor style of Hampton Court alive. When we visited Hampton Court, there were several men and women dresses up as Tudors walking around giving tours of the Palace. This made me feel what it must have been like in the time of Henry V111 as these actors were re telling the story of Hampton Court. I feel the managers of Hampton Court have got it right in that sense, but some of the buildings have been altered too, which has spoiled the attraction, and also the introduction from tourism of caf�'s and restaurants etc., also I feel spoil the sense of Tudor atmosphere at the Palace I came to an overall conclusion that Hampton Court was not a valuable source of information when referring to how Henry used the palace. The reason for this is that many parts of the palace have been restored and refurbished for a number of different reasons, and in different eras so many original Tudor items can no longer be seen. Henry's private rooms are all gone. These would have included a library, bathroom, dressing room and galleries. We therefore cannot tell how he used them and thus make no deductions about the past from them. From my visit to Hampton Court, I can deduct that Hampton Court Palace, as an historical site cannot provide us with the correct and valid information to find out precisely how the Tudor court would have been used. However, put together with other sources, it allows historians to get an accurate picture of how life would have been for Henry and his servants during the sixteenth century at Hampton Court. ...read more.

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