• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In the context of the years 1865 to 1969, to what extent was Federal Legislation the most important factor for improving the Civil Rights of Black Americans in the USA? (Extract)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐In the context of the years 1865 to 1969, to what extent was Federal Legislation the most important factor for improving the Civil Rights of Black Americans in the USA? In the context of the years 1865 to 1969, it is evident that Civil Legislation had the biggest impact on Black Civil Legislation in the USA. Throughout the time period Civil Legislation formed a timeline of success for Black Americans in their fight for fair rights and freedom. From the very beginning of this time period Civil Legislation proved to provide a strong bases for change. In 1869, for instance, the 15th Amendment was ratified, giving Black men the right to vote as citizens of the United States of America. This was mass improvement from their treatment in the earlier parts of the 1800s and saw them treated with more equality. ...read more.

Middle

The legislation finally abolished slavery in the USA. The new legislation was of great joy to the Blacks, who had been previously ?freed? in 1863, because it furthered their progression to be seen as ?people? rather than objects for use by rich White Americans. The House of Representatives were particularly supportive of Civil Rights bills and, as such, voted 199 to 96 in favour of passing the legislation, after initially declining it a year before. The initial impact of the amendment freed 40,000 Blacks still held in servitude in Kentucky. Such success was seen for the most part that the bill was praised widely across the nation. Whilst the bill had a mostly positive outcome for those held in servitude in a lot of the country, in the South many struggled to leave their current domestic situations. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore, without the legislation being passed the presence of slavery would have continued and preserved to continue much long that in reality. However, it is important to note that, whilst the legislation in its own right improve lives, its implementation was arguably put down to President Abraham Lincoln. While his political astuteness gave him the intelligence to stay out of the way while the legislation was considered; he ?let it be known that he favoured it?[4] and he ?vigorously backed it in the struggle in the House of Representatives?[5] when it was first released. (NOT SURE ABOUT THIS PART?) ________________ [1] New York Daily - February 1st 1865 [2] Douglas A. Blackmon - ?Slavery by Another Name? [3] Douglas A. Blackmon - ?Slavery of Another Kind?, Page 1 [4] Charles A. Dana, Recollections of the Civil War, p. 174-177 [5] Charles A. Dana, Recollections of the Civil War, p. 174-177. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    To what extent were Malcolm X and the subsequent Black Power Movement the 'Evil ...

    4 star(s)

    "White self-interest ensured poor prospects for better education and housing for ghetto blacks."45 Whites wanted to keep African Americans separate in order to keep house prices up and make sure black children could not hold back white children in education.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    This, however, changed when Woodrow Wilson came to power. A Southerner himself, he was very much used to the idea that African Americans were second-class citizens, and held the racist views that were, for him, a cultural norm - and among his first actions on coming to power was to dismiss all African American advisors, and he refused to

  1. Linguistic Study - Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream', and ...

    He chose this venue because of what it symbolises to all American people. It is described as a 'hallowed spot', again finding common ground with all Americans. The Gettysburg Address is actually transcribed on the walls of this memorial. By holding the demonstration here, it is associating Martin Luther King's

  2. To what extent do you agree with Abraham Lincoln that slavery was 'somehow the ...

    The Confederacy has taken over most of the arsenals and forts that were in the South. There were exceptions however, Fort Pickens and Fort Sumter which were on islands. There were less than a hundred troops in Sumter led by Robet Anderson.

  1. Revision notes - the USA 1945 to 1980

    The governor Orval Faubus, ordered the local state troops to stop the students from entering the college. He claimed this was for "their own safety, as he could not guarantee they would not be attacked by the crowds that had gathered.

  2. To what extent was Federal government responsible for improving the status of black people ...

    This was the case during Truman?s presidency. He was simply unable to overcome the opposition of Congress. Because of this, he avoided using Congress as a way of passing legislation and instead pushed executive orders. Examples of these would be executive order 9980 which guaranteed fair employment practices in the

  1. Martin Luther King. Martin was one of Americas greatest civil rights activists, shaping ...

    King first came across Gandhi in a lecture while in Crozer. King said ?Christ furnished the spirit and motivation, while Gandhi furnished the method.? Martin considered Gandhi to be the ?guiding light of our technique for nonviolent social change.? Gandhi never wavered from the principle of ahimsa, which is the Hinduism doctrine on non-violence.

  2. Civil Rights Revision Cards 1945-68

    Also, schools and some public places remained segregated. March on Washington (1963: King/SCLC ? + NAACP, CORE, SNCC, Grassroots) Overview In 1963 more than 200,000 people join the March on Washington. Congregating at the Lincoln Memorial, participants listen as Martin Luther King delivers his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work