• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In what ways did the work of BletchleyPark influence the outcome of the Second World War?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In what ways did the work of Bletchley Park influence the outcome of the Second World War? 30th of April 1945, Berlin fell to the Russians and the war in Europe was over when the Germans unconditionally surrendered 7days later at Rheims. The war may have been over in Europe but it did not end until the dropping of the Atom Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, this forced the Japanese into submission. The war ended with the formal surrender of Japan in Tokyo Bay. Bletchley Park helped to end the war a predicted 2 years early, although there were some parts of the war they had no influence on e.g. The Americans joining the war and the over expansion of the German Army. The German Armies over expansion was one of the reasons that the war was won by the Allies. The most famous battle of this was the battle of Stalingrad between the Russians Red Army and the Germans; Stalingrad was a mixture of homes and industry named after the country's leader, Joseph Stalin. It stretched for over 60km along the River Volga. ...read more.

Middle

Together, both islands cost more lives than the D-Day invasion of Normandy. The code breakers of Bletchley Park had nothing to do with the American Decision to drop atomic bombs on the city of Hiroshima on August 6th 1945. The plane was blessed by a priest before it took of with its unforgivable load. On the impact of the bomb over 70,000 civilians were killed with many more thousands dying later from burns, various forms of cancer and radiation poisoning. Another bomb was later dropped on Nagasaki with equally horrifying results. There were a lot of events in the second world war that were not affected by the work of the people at Bletchley Park, There were still lots of aspects that were affected by their work for example they had a large influence on the war in Northern Africa and on the D-Day invasion of Normandy. In the Atlantic German U-Boats were attacking Allied Merchant ship convoys effectively depriving the British of Vital supplies that were needed for the war effort. On May 9th 1941, U110 had been about to attack an Allied convoy when it was forced to surface by British ships protecting the convoy. The German Crew surrendered. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was also the job of Bletchley park to locate the least defended parts of the French coast so the Allied Forces would have minimal losses during the invasion. The allies did not want the Germans to know that they had cracked the code and the allies were listening to their plans. The possession of German Military plans was vital and many soldiers died in campaigns which to anyone without any knowledge of military affair or strategy were doomed to fail but these campaigns were to lull the Germans into a thinking that their plans had not been discovered. In the final years of the wars as the Germans enjoyed the success in the regions of Belgium, the allies did not change their plan of sending thousands of troops to their death to keep the secrecy that would ultimately lead to the vital victory. To conclude Bletchley Park helped in many ways to shorten the war by helping with individual battles i.e. the Normandy Beach Landings and the War in the North Atlantic. There were also a lot of aspects through the war Bletchley park had very little or no influence over such as the ongoing fighting between the Germans and Russians and the entrance of the Americans into the war. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Explain how the Schlieffen Plan was meant to work?

    The major-general then ask his regimental sergeant-major, 'what is the second difference?' he replies 'The absence of the General, Sir'. This cartoon was designed to shows to the public that the major-generals gave orders during the war, however they did not carry them out themselves the soldiers did.

  2. Total War, Britain during the Second World War

    It was one example of many of Hitler interfering in matters that he knew little about. The RAF had also bombed Berlin for the first, which Goering, the head of the Luftwaffe, had said would never happen. The switch to bombing London was by way of reprisal.

  1. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    26 March: Three injured in car bomb blast near a shopping centre in Jerusalem. 27 March: In the Israeli resort of Netanya, a bomber blows himself up at a hotel, killing 28 Israelis celebrating Passover. 29 March: A woman bomber kills herself and two others at a Jerusalem supermarket.

  2. The Cold War was a big rivalry that developed after World War II.

    organization would be the place to deal with Stalin, not at Yalta. He told Adolf Berle "I didn't say the result was good. I said it was the best I could do." Both Roosevelt and Churchill recognized the reality of Soviet power in 1945.

  1. Explain the importance of the Battle of Britain as a turning point in the ...

    Along with Britain's shortage in the army sector, again due to the battles over France the RAF was short on planes as well while Germany was perfectly well equipped with aircraft due to the re-armament regime in the 1930's. this meant Germany had the upper hand over Britain and could

  2. By 1943 Britain had overcome the threat posed by German aircraft and submarines. Explain ...

    This made it extremely impossible to maintain a solid attack. On top of this the Germans were fighting in inferior fighters, which were no match to the British hurricanes and Spitfires. RAF pilots who bailed out were able to return to duty while German pilots who did so became prisoners of war.

  1. History course work bombing of Hiroshima

    no need of such a cowards attack and so this means there was no need in dropping the and he was against it also he was Japanese so would be biased against America and including the bomb. Another source I found was one by a American tactician who said it

  2. Why did hitler bomb british cities?

    Pre war estimates were 600,000 dead as the wrong predictions were made - millions of cardboard coffins were not needed and 750,000 hospital beds were not needed. Nothing had been planned the 2,250,000 homeless". And every time a paper was about to go to print, the ministry of information would

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work