• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Is Utilitarian field of thought still present in todays policing

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

This essay will address the influence of Utilitarian thought in the introduction of policing during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. As a preface to the main essay, the circumstances that had been causing concern up to that point will be addressed, with the argument for whether Utilitarian thought is still present in today's policing and prison system concluding it. In Britain, a large population meant more poverty which brought with it desperation, which meant more crime. There was a rise of the new middle class who saw themselves as the new rich, and were adamant no one was going to take their newly gained money, and the power that they had gained resulted in them being willing to do anything to not return to being poor. The middle classes began to coax the police presence on the streets to be of a more similar standing to that already in place within the City of London and other urban areas. There were not enough trained police at this time, so punishments were determined by the individuals ability to pay. From the poor there was widespread anger at the lack of a voice, and they were concerned greatly with the unfairness the legal system in place at that time was giving them. ...read more.

Middle

Up until now the death penalty was controlling the criminal by the nature of the punishment but was allowing no room for reform from the criminal. (Briggs J, Harrison C, McInnes A and Vincent D 1996) The Utilitarian school of thought would work for both the Government and the population as a whole. It was a functional and effective way of policing. The good of the many had to outweigh the good of the individual. The individual had to be educated into believing that it was in their best interests not to commit crime, and the introduction of a trained force that could earn respect from the individual rather than disapproval was the best way forward. The Utilitarian influence on the Government was evident at this time. Bentham pointed out in his "Introduction to the Principles of Morals & Legislation" published in 1789 that there should be a fundamental review of use of prisons for sentencing, as opposed to more crimes getting the death penalty, as "all punishment is an evil, which under the theory of utility should be administered only when it promises to exclude some even greater evil" (Briggs J, Harrison C, McInnes A and Vincent D 1996 p168). ...read more.

Conclusion

However, a difficulty arose with the Open Days when mainly middle classes visited which resulted in offending patterns not altering. In 1863 a new set of policies were introduced involving longer periods of isolation, longer work periods and exercise for the offender to undertake during their stay in prison. It could be argued that today as prison is intended for reform, the punishment fitting the crime, there is in place a respected police force upholding the law, policing is benefiting society as a whole and its intention is in educating individuals into not wanting to commit crime, that these are the Utilitarian thoughts being firmly in place. In conclusion, the Utilitarians had set out to influence the introduction of an "effective, efficient, functional, practical, sensible, serviceable and useful" policing system to Britain in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. (The Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of Utilitarianism). By the nineteenth century, there was strong Utilitarian influence guiding many of the new policies, not punishing offenders, but encouraging their reformation, which has been carried through into the modern day policing and prison system. Total words = 1160 Student: Justine Nathan Tutor: James Anstice 1 Student No: 120136 November 2007 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System Module: ASS12-1 Student: Justine Nathan Tutor: Chris Crooks Level 2 - Counselling Skills November 2007 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Historical Periods section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Historical Periods essays

  1. The First English Civil War

    They were so severely handled that the siege was given up the next day. Later, Manchester retook Lincoln and Gainsborough. Thus Lincolnshire, which had been almost entirely in Newcastle's hands before he was compelled to undertake the siege of Hull, was added, in fact as well as in name, to the Eastern Association.

  2. Cities were the main driving force of the Reformation in Germany(TM) " explain whether ...

    attention to the spread of Lutheranism in Germany, as between 1522 - 9, Charles himself was not even in the country. As a result of this, Charles delegated his powers of day-to-day running of the Empire to his younger brother, Ferdinand of Austria.

  1. The storming of the BAstille was the most significant event in 1789

    The estates general met as three separate groups, however the 3rd estate wanted them all to meet as one, and refused to do

  2. Julius Caesars reform

    a political apprenticeship, he performed army services and studied rhetoric (public speaking) - In 75BC, he left Rome go Rhodes to study with the great teacher Apollonius Molon. (public speaking) - "Caesar's natural ability as a political speaker was of the highest order, and that he took the greatest order,

  1. Mideival Outline Essay

    The High Middle Ages saw the weakening of the central royal authority and the rise of power of the local feudal lords who could count on their loyal vassal and eventually became absolutely independent rulers on their territory. However, administrative changes in the 11th and 12th centuries forced the monarchs

  2. How effective was the leadership provided by prominent individual nationalists in Malaya?

    Ibrahim also suffered from a lack of charisma. He was not known for the style of his speeches but for his "sharp analysis of rational precision" (Milner, 1994) - terms people would hardly use to describe American President Obama's rhetoric.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work