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Propaganda in the First World War.

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Introduction

Propaganda in the First World War Question 1 To a historian studying propaganda Source A and B are both useful because they give different forms of evidence. Source A is an extract from a novel and therefore it is fiction and is written to entertain. Even though it is fiction the extract is useful as it enables us to capture the moment of the time, it gives a unique view on how citizens felt about the war and joining it. It describes how the writer went to the cinema and instead of watching a film he ended up cheering for the country and its allies, and signing the national anthem. This source gives many different aspects of propaganda, one of which is persuasion, propaganda such as this came across in films also, films of battles were created showing the courageous men of war, and how wonderful the war was, trying to influence men to sign up. Another method used in this extract is fun and excitement; the writer describes how they sang and cheered for their country and allies, which makes the reader feel proud of his/her country. Hatred for the enemy also comes across quietly in the extract, as there is no mention of them as they are blamed for starting the war. This source tells us that there was a general excitement over the war, as many people didn't realize what was actually happening at the front. ...read more.

Middle

The workers believed in international togetherness, that they were forced into war, and that they had no hatred against the German workers but with the German leaders who their war was against. They strongly felt that the war was between the "Ruling classes of Europe" and did not involve them, and this is the message they put across in their article. The attitudes of these two sources differ so much because source C is from the Punch magazine, which is controlled by the government. The governments aim is to make the citizens of Britain feel hatred and disgust for the enemy, in order to aid war effort and to encourage recruitment. They are both written by very different political authors, for different purposes. Question 3 "The most important aim of wartime propaganda was to encourage hatred for the enemy." This interpretation was the main aim of wartime propaganda, however it was also used to encourage war recruitment, to increase support and the nations morale, and to prepare people for what may happen in the future. Source C supports this statement; it shows the Kaiser standing over a family in Belgium with mass destruction around him, this is a powerful image and brings feelings of disgust and hatred of Germans into the mind or British people viewing the poster. The Kaiser is looking triumphant which makes the citizens angry that their side may not be winning the war, or doing so well in it, again this brings feelings of hatred across to the audience of the poster. ...read more.

Conclusion

The recruitment poster is aimed at recruitment and it uses subjects such as king and country to influence it on the men. The rhyme that is pasted across it is reminding the men of Britain, that if they go to war to defend their country what will they be gaining when the war is over. The source does not have any mention of hatred of the enemy. Source I concentrates on boasting morale of the country, it creates good images of the battles that the soldiers are in, and that they are have a good time in the process. On the poster there is no mention on death of the British, It only creates the image of helpless Germans who cry "kamerad!" when a British soldier shouts surrender. The poster is censored by the government as it is heavily exaggerated and there is no negative talk towards the British. I disagree with the statement that "The most important aim of wartime propaganda was to encourage hatred of the enemy". This is because there isn't sufficient evidence to support this; only one source fully concentrates on this factor. I think the most important aim of wartime propaganda is wartime recruitment; this is because there are many sources to backup this statement, and it's the factor that would have the biggest influence on the war. Sources A, E and G, all concentrate on recruitment for the war. The sources are also trying to increase support for the war effort, and to prepare the country for any coming events. Shaun Gilchrist C11 Page - 1 ...read more.

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