• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Richard III and the stability and unstability of England.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Sophie Relph History Essay- Richard III and the stability and unstability of England Richard became King of England on July the sixth 1483 after the heir to the throne was proclaimed illegitimate. Whether this claim was true or not is questionable. During Richards reign, the stability of England has been debated. Was he the ruler England needed to end the 'Wars of the Roses' and bring stability back to the English people? Or did he cause England to be restless and unsettled? Is it a good thing that Henry Tudor defeated him in the Battle of Bosworth? This essay will look at the different points, which, under the reign of Richard III made the country stable or unstable. England under Richard III was stable in that he had lots of experience. He had been made ruler of the North of England in 1471 and had been allowed to Marry Anne due to his loyalty to his brother Edward IV whilst he was King. ...read more.

Middle

This proved that he had won the support of most of Britain, this was probably because people knew that he had been a loyal supporter of his brother during his reign and most people had liked Edward IV. Buckingham's rebellion was dealt with effectively and discreetly to prevent publicity. If the rebellion had been made a bid deal of people might have started to doubt the capability of their ruler. Another reason why England was seen as stable during Richards's reign was that he managed to refrain from having any civil war during his time on throne. This was helpful because civil war caused death and if there had been the country would have been seen as unstable. England was quite free from fighting until the Battle of Bosworth began and the plots started taking place. However, Richard had done some stupid things, which lost him support and gained him many enemies. At the time enemies were bad to have because they could lead to him getting overthrown. ...read more.

Conclusion

People associated Richard with the Woodvilles and this made him unpopular and unstable. All the executions were another factor to Richards's instability. Executions were thought of as an excuse for getting rid of your opponents and this was seen to be an easy way out of it. The rebellions suggest that England under Richard III was unstable. The very fact that there were rebellions means that many people were unhappy with Richard and the way the country was being run. These influences would have unsettled people who mightn't otherwise question the way the country was being run. After explaining both sides of the argument the conclusion is that England was unstable under the rule of Richard III. Although he had popularity, he didn't have the loyal aristocratic support he needed to run the country. Some people thought he was the rightful king but many others doubted him due to the executions. The majority were just waiting for Henry Tudor to come along and side with them. He maintained the country as well as he could but nothing could stop his enemies plotting together to undermine his authority. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. The Battle of Bosworth.

    This ploy is reported by Vergil, " in the mean time th'Earl of Oxford fearing lest his men on fighting might be environed of the multitude commanded in every rank that no soldiers should go above 10 foot from the standards; which charge being known when all men had throng

  2. Discuss Shakespeare's presentation of women in Richard III. Are they convincing characters?

    She is predicting that this is the height of her fortune- therefore the wheel of fortune is turning against her. At this point, her husband is alive, thus she has the means to imprison people, but the next time we see her, Act 2 Scene 2, she has lost her power as 'our King is dead.'

  1. What was the most significant cause of civil strife in England from 1455-61?

    Despite this, the foundations of Richards's insubordination do lie with his background. After the usurpation of Richard II in 1399, royal blood was an incredibly useful commodity and Richard Duke of York certainly was a magnate of the blood royal.

  2. How important was foreign support for Henry Tudor in explaining Richard III

    When the French king heard about the alliance between Richard III and the Duke of Brittany he decided to back Henry Tudor as he felt they might have joined together against France. At this point Henry is placed in a very good position as he now has the backing of the king of France.

  1. In what ways was England stable during the reign of Richard III?

    On my troth, I never liked the conditions of any prince so well as his. God hath sent him to us for the weal of us all." This proves that in some ways England was stable during Richard III reign because the people were satisfied to have him as king at the start of his reign.

  2. Nell Gwyn (Playhouse Cretaures) essay

    Charles invited Nell and her date (a Mr. Villiers, a cousin of Buckingham's) to supper, along with his brother James, the Duke of York. The anecdote turns charming if perhaps apocryphal at this point: the King, after supper, discovered that he had no money on him; nor did his brother.

  1. How effective was Richard III as King of England?

    He was not like because of his greatest limitation- his usurpation, which shadows all of his actions. He did not have a good relationship with his Nobles and his death is testimony to failure of his relationship with ay least one of his magnates.

  2. Why was Henry Tudor able to overthrow Richard III?

    and not thinking out fully the consequences of his actions meant that Henry Tudor almost had an open path at Bosworth to defeat him. Richard's failure to stamp out significant opposition to him, despite his suppression of the rebellion against him in 1483 caused significant problems.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work