• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Russian History. A period of great achievement To what extent do you agree with this assessment of Sophias tenure as regent from 1682-1689?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

?A period of great achievement? To what extent do you agree with this assessment of Sophia?s tenure as regent from 1682-1689. Sophia came to power after the Streltsy revolt, there was no opposition ? Matveev was dead, Natalya was overwhelmed by the tragedy that had engulfed her family, peter was a boy of ten. But peter was still tsar, as he grew older, he would try to assert his power; the Naryshkins would collect influence, and this Miloslavsky victory would prove only temporary. Sophia?s plan required another step. On May 23, prompted by her agents, the Streltsy demanded a change in the occupancy of the Russian throne. In a petition sent to Khovansky, whom Sophia already had appointed as their commander, the Streltsy pointed out there was a certain illegality to peter?s election as tsar; he was the son of the second wife, while Ivan, the son of the first wife and the older of the two boys, had been shunted aside. It was not proposed that peter be dethroned; he was the son of a tsar, he had been elected and then proclaimed by the patriarch. Instead, the Streltsy demanded that peter and Ivan rule jointly as co-tsars. If the petition was not granted, they threatened to attack the kremlin. Ruling under the guidance of her chief adviser and lover, Prince Vasily V. ...read more.

Middle

Promoting the case of her brother Ivan V, a legitimate heir to the throne, Sophia attempted to convince the patriarch and the boyars that their recent decision to crown Peter should be reversed. Insisting that Peter?s election breaks monarchic laws by skipping over her brother, who would have been next in line to rule if not for his ineptitude, she proposed a shared crown with Ivan. Upon the court?s swift and unanimous rejection of dual tsars, Sophia reached to the discouraged military troop, the Streltsy, for their aid and support. The unjust dismissal of Ivan?s reign acted as a catalyst to the already displeased and frustrated troops. Multiple issues, including merciless motivational tactics and lack of rest, drove the Streltsy to violently oppose the ?unjust? election of Peter. As the fighting ceased and Peter?s life was left forever scarred by the blood spilt within his Naryshkin clan, the Streltsy received their initial demands. Following the momentum of the Streltsy rebellion, the incompetent Ivan was crowned senior tsar and Peter, of only nine years, junior tsar. Despite her gender, Sophia had been deemed the sole intellectually mature royalty at the time of Fedor?s death, making her the favourite to govern in place of the child, Peter, and the inept Ivan. Using the education and political savvy she acquired by Fedor?s side, she convinced the nobles and patriarch of her capacities to rule Russia. ...read more.

Conclusion

Most of the Streltsy units, however, deserted downtown Moscow for the suburb of Preobrazhenskoye and later for the Troitse-Sergiyeva Lavra, where the young tsar was living. Feeling the power slipping from her hands, Sophia sent the boyars and the Patriarch to Peter, asking him to join her in the Kremlin. He flatly refused her overtures, demanding Shaklovityi's execution and Galitzine's exile. After Sophia agreed to surrender her senior boyars, she was arrested and forced to withdraw into the Novodevichy Convent without formally taking the veil. Sophia may have plotted one last attempt at securing power, although her involvement is unclear. Regardless of her conscious effort, her fate was sealed ten years later, when the Streltsy attempted to reinstate her in the Kremlin during Peter's absence from the country. This uprising was suppressed with an iron hand, and soon the corpses of the rebels were suspended in front of Sophia's windows. Having taken the veil, she was kept in the strictest seclusion, with other nuns not allowed to see her except on Easter day. She died in the Novodevichy Convent 6 years later. Although Sophia was guided by outsiders, she therefore made mistakes which didn?t help Russia. She did create better connections with the countries surrounding Russia. She tried to stop the Turks even if she was unsuccessful. She achieved little bits for Russia but nothing was of great achievement. She also had the shadow of peter and his family hanging over her, there was always the threat of peter trying to take over power. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Historical Periods section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Historical Periods essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To what extent was warfare between Britain and France the main contributory factor in ...

    3 star(s)

    the Kingdom of Portugal, the Duchy of Savoy and the Spanish loyal to Archduke Charles. France and England were still recovering from the economic battering their previous conflict caused upon them, this perhaps being the reason William III struggled to get support initially for war against France thus being a

  2. Why Were Some Forms Of Nationalism More Successful Than Others In Achieving Concessions From ...

    This drew attention, and brought to the fore, an MP not in the traditional mould, but later described as "an Englishman of the strongest type moulded for an Irish purpose", named Charles Stuart Parnell. He succeeded Butt in leadership of the party and was able to draw Fenian support to

  1. To what extent was the Dutch Revolt in 1572 primarily caused by Religion?

    Although Mechelen, Zutphen and Naarden surrendered to him in 1572, the inhabitants were massacred. After this date there was little Dutch surrender. Whilst Geyl's argument of Alva being a main cause is valid, he focuses primarily on the "Blood Council" rather than on Alva's mistakes.

  2. To what extent had the Russian economy been successfully modernised by 1914?

    The result of this was that the peasants were bound to the land, as they needed to pay redemption payments to commune. Ultimately, whilst from 1877 to 1905 there was a growth in peasant owned land from 6 million hectares to 21.6 million hectares, it can be seen that the peasants remained an exploited underclass on who the economy relied.

  1. The First English Civil War

    There was no further talk of the concentric advance of three armies on London. The fiery prince and the methodical Earl of Forth (now honoured with the Earldom of Brentford) were at one, at least, in recommending that the Oxford area, with its own garrison and a mobile force, should be the pivot of the field armies' operations.

  2. To what extent is it true to say the Provisional Government faced an impossible ...

    The order also greatly undermined the Provisional Government in the minds of ordinary Russian people because it is commonplace of history that any government that does not have direct control of its army cannot wield real power, which meant that the Provisional Government lacked ultimate control and were forced to compromise with the Soviet.

  1. Why did Britain not establish an independant Palestine jointly ruled by Arabs and Jews ...

    Adding to Britain's interest over the region was the recently discovered oil fields in the Persian gulf at a time when Britain's navy was beginning to switch from steam power to oil powered fuel. Thus Arab independence or nationalism was a threat to British interests in the region, which meant no decisive steps were taken to creating an independent state.

  2. The events in India in 1856/7 were caused by the issue of the new ...

    the way they had been treated and how it had changed over the previous years. Also in recent years the lack of communication between the Sepoys and their officials had been decreasing. Native officers, who might have provided an essential connection between the two, commanded little authority with their men and were not given positions of trust with British officers.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work