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The British government had to introduce many new ideas to rule effectively between 1914 and 1918, including restricting personal freedoms, considerable use of propaganda and rationing. Explain the effects of these.

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Introduction

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Middle

An average of 1500 soldiers were killed each day of the four years of war. Constantly having to scan the newspapers, praying that their brother, father or son were still alive, greatly reduced all enthusiasm for the war. By 1916, it wasn�t only the soldiers at risk of death. German gun shells and Zeppelins made living a constant struggle and many were killed miles away from the battlefields. In reality no one was ever safe during the conflict; neither man nor women, however young or old. It made little difference whether people lived in the cities or country as all were at risk. I feel this would have brought all people together and make them realize the true horrors involved in war due to the constant fear of being told a close one has died. Men weren�t the only ones affected by war; women were required to work in the factories producing ammunition. This was very dangerous work as there was risk of explosions and the harm from the acids, but in the long run this had a profound effect on women, poisoning and killing many of them. It was the start of women independence and by 1916 women were working on the trams, in the police force, ploughing fields and taking on many other jobs that were previously thought unfit for women. ...read more.

Conclusion

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