• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The failure of The League of Nations to prevent aggression in Manchuria and Abyssinia was a major cause of World War II. Explain how the lack of action by the League in these two examples was considered a major cause of war in 1939?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The failure of The League of Nations to prevent aggression in Manchuria and Abyssinia was a major cause of World War II. Explain how the lack of action by the League in these two examples was considered a major cause of war in 1939? The League of Nations failed to prevent aggression in |Manchuria and Abyssinia when they were invaded. Japan invaded Manchuria in 1931. There was no excuse for this and China appealed to the League. Japan promised to withdraw Japanese troops but the generals did not withdraw Japanese troops. The League investigated the matter more but by the time it was reported the Japanese army had captured Manchuria and were invading the rest of China. In 1933, the League condemned the invasion. ...read more.

Middle

It encouraged Hitler to invade the German speaking area of Czechoslovakia, and in 1938 he seized some of it. The area was called the Sudetenland. Appeasement also encouraged Hitler. This is because when the British Prime Minister called Neville Chamberlain stepped into the situation when Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia he flew over to Germany to meet Hitler at Berchtesgaden to see if peace could be achieved by discussion. Hitler was willing to talk to Chamberlain. Hitler thought he might as well get what he wants without fighting. Hitler demanded the Sudetenland for Germany, on the grounds that it was a German-speaking area Chamberlain thought that was reasonable and that Germany should be allowed that as they were treated very harshly in the Treaty of Versailles. ...read more.

Conclusion

It just speeded up the process to war. Hitler always intended to go to war and the failure of the League speeded it up. Hitler was not going to stop invading Czechoslovakia because of his foreign policy. He just thought that he might as well use Chamberlain and the policy of appeasement to get what he wanted. You could say that the league could have stopped World |War II because it could have stopped Hitler. However, even if Hitler was stopped Hitler's self determination would have caused him to start up again and finish off Czechoslovakia and then start a war. Hitler always intended to go to war no matter what. Overall, I think the self-determination of Hitler was the main cause of war in 1939 and the failure of the League was minor cause. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Why did the League of Nations fail?

    5 star(s)

    There were however more than just two short term causes relating to the League's failure. "Interest does not bind men together: interest separates men. There is only one thing that can bind men together, and that is common devotion to right."2 Woodrow Wilson Wilson's faith in 'Moral Force' had been proved unjustified twice more.

  2. Vietnam war

    On the communist side, even before the Geneva Accords were signed, H� Ch� Minh had prepared to attack South Vietnam in case unification failed to take place through elections. His preparations included communication with thousands of covert communist agents in the south and the hiding of numerous weapons caches.

  1. To What Extent did Commandos contribute to final victory in World War Two

    The effect of the raid was startling on the German High Command who had largely thought Britain as out of the war. Archery was the first time all three services combined their resources to mount an amphibious raid against a defended coast.

  2. What were the causes of World War II?

    The defeated powers had difficulty paying reparations to the victors, and the victors had difficulty repaying their loans to the United States. The shift from a wartime economy to a peacetime economy caused further problems. Italy and Japan suffered from too many people and too few resources after World War I.

  1. "The League of Nations representedno more than

    The Refugee commission worked to help refuges and was rather successful in doing so. The Refugee commission helped refuges get back on their feet after they a fled from the country by providing them with housing, food etc.... The commission also observed the worldwide flow of refugees.

  2. 'At Munich Hitler gained what he wanted and achieved conquest without firing a shot' ...

    Taylor's work has been scrutinised and has often been the subject of criticism, this is due to approach he takes when deriving and interpreting information on the subject area. Many historians feel that when Taylor sifts through the information he only highlights the information that supports his opportunist school of thought.

  1. Why was the League of Nations a failure in the 1930's?

    Britain seemed more interested in keeping up relations with Japan than agreeing to sanctions. Member counties could not even agree about banning arms sales to Japan. They were worried Japan might retaliate, escalating a war. There was no prospect of Britain or France risking their navies or armies in a war with Japan.

  2. Explain the role of Czechoslovakia in the appeasement story.

    The British conservative government in their election said that they would focus their attention on the League of Nations and really push the cause of collective security. But this basically meant Britain would appear to be firm without any real intension of going to War.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work