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The growth of Radicalism among African Americans was important in helping them gain their Civil Rights in the 1960s Why do you agree or disagree with this view? (24 marks)

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Introduction

Lorraine Klauser ?The growth of Radicalism among African Americans was important in helping them gain their Civil Rights in the 1960?s? Why do you agree or disagree with this view? (24 marks) The growth growth of radicalism among African-Americans was important in helping them gain their civil rights during the 1960s as it gave the movement strength and a sense of presence; this was also spread to the North. Malcom X and Stokeley Carmichael were public speakers with a strong message of black power; attracted younger Afircan- Americans to the cause of the Civil Rights movements and therefore managed to widespread the appeal. ...read more.

Middle

The worldwide media attention on the riots in America meant that racism was made visible to everyone and therefore made it difficult for the politicians and President to ignore the issues of brutality. The situation was humiliating for the President as he tried to reate a perfect picture of America. This pressure led to noticeable results of more Civil Rights legislation. However, cracks soon developed in the civil rights movement which made it less effective. Some politicians also wouldn?t let the media intimidate them and criticised the methods being used. ...read more.

Conclusion

The FBI called the party; ?the greatest threat to the internal security of the country.?? There was soon a crackdown on the African-Americans, especially the Black Panthers. The non-violent methods limited chaos and were more effective in comparison to radicalism, as instead of working towards their goal, they gained publicity, pushing the civil rights movement forward but the rioting made it seem, a way of giving up and letting them win. In conclusion I agree that radicalism helped in the civil rights movement. It possibly helped speed up the process of obtaining the civil rights but also hindered it from progressing with the threat it played publically. ...read more.

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