• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Ku Klux Klan prevented African Americans from gaining civil rights in the years 1960 to 1964. Explain why you agree or disagree with this view. (24)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

?The Ku Klux Klan prevented African Americans from gaining civil rights in the years 1960 to 1964.? Explain why you agree or disagree with this view. (24) The ?Ku Klux Klan? were an Anglo-Saxon based cult who believed solely on white supremacy. The movement was first formed in the 1860?s in order to protect white rights; they mainly formed in the very deep southern states of America. Since starting the ?KKK? has gone through phases of popularity followed by essentially fading in number. However in 1915 the ?KKK? was reestablished with great force, now standing for what they described as Americanism, Christianity and Morality. After this The ?KKK? continued to grow in number up until the late 1960?s, boasting numbers between two and five million members including some important political influence. The ?KKK? mostly used there aggressive manner and force they brought upon the black people. This intimidation stopped the black people from living near white communities and also made sure they would not complain or try to use their rights. This was so affective because the black people were so afraid or murder and torture they did not complain or protest for civil rights, therefore keeping this problem from the rest of America and the world. ...read more.

Middle

These members also made sure that politically civil rights laws were not passed and in a state bases laws were not even kept. For example Bull Conner had powerful jobs within Birmingham, Alabama and the police chief for that town and due to his known racism made sure that all black citizens of Birmingham were treated badly and were refused freedom of speech, therefore this created an even bigger state of fear for citizens of Alabama at that time. Many Black people living within Southern states as soon as they saved enough money or sorted out arrangements? moved form the south to the north were they knew they would be treated fairer. This was made sure by the ?KKK? that there were not enough blacks to even fight for their rights even if they could, for example if they could vote there would not be enough black people to make a difference and made sure that integration into white schools was not a problem. Also if black people were fleeing from the south to the north the ?KKK? had won as they did not want to live amongst them anyway and made sure they knew they had forced them out by their intense persecution. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore in the long run the Klan just hindered themselves and made sure essentially that the black were treated better and given more rights. The influx of many civil rights activist groups such as the NAACP and the SCLC essentially cancelled out the ?KKK? as these groups thanks to the likes of Martin Luther King used clever modern tactics to counteract the Klan?s forces. These groups supported blacks in all areas from peaceful protest to help in the court rooms. The Klan?s unimaginative and predictable methods were no match for the power of things like the media and use of making sympathy for the black people in the south. The NAACP even helped black people get the vote in southern states so. Therefore there were civil rights sympathizes even in southern states. In conclusion, The ?Ku Klux Klan? was a successful movement and stopped many black people from succeeding in gaining Civil Rights mainly in the South. However, In 1964 The Civil Rights Act was passed and therefore could not succeed and never really stopped it, essentially they just succeeded in prolonging this act for a while. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    Canada, which ruled that where segregation was in force, the facilities provided must be equal. Whilst this did not appear to represent a great divergence from the ruling of Plessy v. Ferguson, it did at least show that the Supreme Court was willing to take a marginally more active stance

  2. Peer reviewed

    To what extent were Malcolm X and the subsequent Black Power Movement the 'Evil ...

    4 star(s)

    Like Malcolm X before them, groups within the BPM aimed at improving the conditions in the ghettos. Striking figures of black illiteracy - only 32% of black pupils in the ghetto finished high school - and high rates of unemployment - in the early 1960s, 46% of those unemployed were

  1. How did anti-rights groups hinder the progress of Civil Rights for African Americans from ...

    During the 1928 election, the Klan ran a hate campaign against Albert E. Smith, the Democratic candidate, as he was a Catholic. As a result of this, Hoover won the election, which can be seen as a negative development for African Americans, as he held slightly more racist views, and did little to help the course of Civil Rights.

  2. 'Johnson alone bears the responsibility for the escalation of war in Vietnam in the ...

    on every front of human activity.? And ?We are not about to send American boys nine or ten thousand miles away from home to do what Asian boys ought to be doing for themselves.? (1964) so it seems like he wants to get this out of the way and shows his personality by saying they can?t handle their own problems.

  1. Research on the major Civil rights events between 1963 to 1968

    Birmingham's public schools were integrated in September 1963. Governor Wallace sent National Guard troops to keep black students out but President Kennedy reversed Wallace by ordering the troops to stand down. Violence continued to plague the city, however. Someone threw a tear gas canister into Loveman's department store when it

  2. Civil Rights Revision Cards 1945-68

    1950 1. In McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents the Supreme Court rules that a public institution of higher learning could not provide different treatment to a student solely because of his race. 2. In Sweatt v. Painter the Supreme Court ruled that a separate-but-equal Texas law school was actually unequal,

  1. Was Lincoln a genuine advocate for civil rights for African Americans?

    Lincoln publically claimed his want to stop the extension of slavery and believed in equality illustrates how he was a genuine advocator for civil rights. Lincoln?s repeated viewpoint on the evil of slavery had its risks and this could suggest he was a genuine advocator for civil rights.

  2. To what extent were African Americans treated as second-class citizens in the states between ...

    The Jim Crow laws declared that society may be ?separate but equal?. Segregation stood firmly in place with no indication that it would be dealt with. Basic facilities and amenities such as restaurants and cinemas banned black people from entering and using their features.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work